Lebanon, Libya to hold conference in Beirut, says Suleiman

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President Michel Suleiman said on Tuesday that Lebanon and Libya agreed to hold a conference in Beirut on November 23 to encourage investment in Libya, a statement from the president’s press office said.

Suleiman, who attended the UN summit earlier in the day to discuss the situation in Libya, said that Tripoli has returned to its “normal position” in the Arab League and in the UN.

“We are glad to welcome the legitimate representative of Libya, Interim Leader Mustafa Abdel Jalil,” Suleiman said in his speech.

“The Libyans expect us to help them achieve their aspirations. In the short term, they expect us to continue protecting civilians, helping the Libyan National Transitional Council maintain security and facilitating the transfer of humanitarian aid. In the long run, they need help in establishing institutions and improving economy. We should not spare any effort to help the Libyan people.” Suleiman said

Libya is opening a new page in its history, and NTC has voiced its determination to establish a democratic country by launching a political project that aims to protect the Libyans’ rights and freedoms, the president said.

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2 responses to “Lebanon, Libya to hold conference in Beirut, says Suleiman”

  1. The illegitmate representative of Libya which has been appointed by NATO. Libya is opening up for imperialism and their companies to extract as much as resources as possible.

    The new chapter is very much the same except with more corruption if that is possible. President Suleiman was wrong on all accounts.

    What is interesting is that the same NATO countries that have waged war in Libya in the name of “protecting civilians” have given “an absymal response to the plight” of refugees during this conflict., Amnesty international charged in a report released Tuesday.
    The report calls urgent attention to the conditions facing some 5,000 refugees and asylum seekers who are stranded at squalid encampments on the borders with Tunisia and Egypt. Forced to flee violence in Libya—just as many of them had been forced to flee their home countries for refuge in Libya—they are no longer allowed to go anywhere else.
    In addition to killing and wounding tens of thousands of Libyans and leaving much of the country’s infrastructure in ruins, the US-NATO war launched last March has proven a catastrophe for the estimated 1.5 million to 2.5 million foreign-born workers who were living and working in Libya when the war began.
    The majority have fled the country, losing their livelihoods and facing extreme hardship. For many thousands, however, escape has proven thus far impossible
    At least 1,500 of these workers are believed to have lost their lives trying to flee Libya by boat. NATO, which has deployed a naval armada off the Libyan coastline, was charged with refusing to rescue people who drowned or died of thirst or starvation while trying to make the crossing to Europe.
    The majority of these workers came to Libya in search of work from poorer countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, including Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Ghana, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Somalia and Sudan.
    They, along with black-skinned Libyans, have been targeted by the NATO-backed “rebels” for violent assaults, imprisonment and lynchings based on the spurious charge that Colonel Muammar Gaddafi used Sub-Saharan African mercenaries to defend his regime.

  2.  Avatar

    The illegitmate representative of Libya which has been appointed by NATO. Libya is opening up for imperialism and their companies to extract as much as resources as possible.

    The new chapter is very much the same except with more corruption if that is possible. President Suleiman was wrong on all accounts.

    What is interesting is that the same NATO countries that have waged war in Libya in the name of “protecting civilians” have given “an absymal response to the plight” of refugees during this conflict., Amnesty international charged in a report released Tuesday.
    The report calls urgent attention to the conditions facing some 5,000 refugees and asylum seekers who are stranded at squalid encampments on the borders with Tunisia and Egypt. Forced to flee violence in Libya—just as many of them had been forced to flee their home countries for refuge in Libya—they are no longer allowed to go anywhere else.
    In addition to killing and wounding tens of thousands of Libyans and leaving much of the country’s infrastructure in ruins, the US-NATO war launched last March has proven a catastrophe for the estimated 1.5 million to 2.5 million foreign-born workers who were living and working in Libya when the war began.
    The majority have fled the country, losing their livelihoods and facing extreme hardship. For many thousands, however, escape has proven thus far impossible
    At least 1,500 of these workers are believed to have lost their lives trying to flee Libya by boat. NATO, which has deployed a naval armada off the Libyan coastline, was charged with refusing to rescue people who drowned or died of thirst or starvation while trying to make the crossing to Europe.
    The majority of these workers came to Libya in search of work from poorer countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, including Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Ghana, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Somalia and Sudan.
    They, along with black-skinned Libyans, have been targeted by the NATO-backed “rebels” for violent assaults, imprisonment and lynchings based on the spurious charge that Colonel Muammar Gaddafi used Sub-Saharan African mercenaries to defend his regime.

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