Druze Israeli MP seeks Turkey’s OK to deliver aid to Syrian refugees

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An Israeli lawmaker is seeking permission from the Turkish government to visit Syrian refugees in Turkey and deliver humanitarian aid to them, an Israeli news report said on Thursday.

Ayoob Kara, a member of the Israeli parliament, Knesset, from Likud and deputy minister for development of the Negev and Galilee, asked for permission to help Syrian refugees in a letter he wrote to Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. Kara, also a member of Israel’s Druze community, submitted his letter to Erdoğan via the Turkish Embassy in Israel, Israeli news site IsraelNationalNews.com said.

“In the name of freedom fighters and civil rights loyalists in Israel and around the world, I ask you to permit the entry of a delegation headed by me, that will bring with it humanitarian aid to the Syrian refugees in Syria. As a Druze with a broad regional orientation, I am greatly concerned about the fate of the Syrian nationals in general, and specifically the refugees who were forced to run away from their homes,” Kara was quoted as saying in the letter.

Kara stated that Turkish Embassy personnel were “surprised,” but promised to deliver the letter to Erdoğan.

Todayszaman

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26 responses to “Druze Israeli MP seeks Turkey’s OK to deliver aid to Syrian refugees”

  1. eblashko Avatar
    eblashko

    Just further proof for everyone who still says that Israel is supporting Assad.

    I love this guy! One of my favorite politicians in Israel. This is how you make peace with the Arabs. Not by signing treaties with their megalomaniac leaders, but by showing Arab PEOPLE that we’re not so bad.

    1. Mosetsfire Avatar
      Mosetsfire

      giving some food and water to 8,500 refugees does not offset the criminal occupation of 3 million Palestinians. I do not discount what this MK is trying to do, but I also do not give it the weight that you do.

      1. eblashko Avatar
        eblashko

         I’m not saying that he’s going to change the world. But every little bit helps.

        And by the way… occupation in itself is not illegal under international law. Settlements are. But occupation isn’t. And the number is more like 1.5 million.

        1. Mosetsfire Avatar
          Mosetsfire

          1.5 million live in Gaza. The West Bank is also occupied. and not all occupation is legal, which is why my comment still stands…its a criminal occupation.

        2. Sussy09 Avatar

          That’s what you get for being nice and kiss their Tuches – They call you are a Criminal!!

      2. eblashko Avatar
        eblashko

         I’m not saying that he’s going to change the world. But every little bit helps.

        And by the way… occupation in itself is not illegal under international law. Settlements are. But occupation isn’t. And the number is more like 1.5 million.

        1. Sussy09 Avatar

          That’s what you get for being nice and kiss their Tuches – They call you are a Criminal!!

      3. eblashko Avatar
        eblashko

        Yes, but we’re not occupying Gaza. We dismantled, both military and 10,000 civilian settlers, in 2005. Unlike the West Bank, Gaza is not under Israeli jurisdiction. Hamas is in total control of the strip.

        I’m not defending the occupation of the West Bank, but it is technically legal. It was occupied from a hostile territory (Jordan) who used it to launch an attack on Israel in 1967, at Egypt’s behest. It is no longer claimed by Jordan, and no polity exists that could ensure the safety of Israeli civilians in the event of a withdrawal, so, for now, the occupation is Legal.

        What is illegal is not providing rights to the Arabs who live there, and the building of settlements. I’m highly critical of Israel for both of these issues. I love my country, but I’m not a “Israel-can-never-do-wrong” patriot. Settlements are a mistake. I don’t think they’re an excuse not to negotiate (Sinai and Gaza both had dozens of settlements what were dismantled for the sake of peace) but they’re certainly not convincing anyone of our good intentions either.

      4. eblashko Avatar
        eblashko

        Yes, but we’re not occupying Gaza. We dismantled, both military and 10,000 civilian settlers, in 2005. Unlike the West Bank, Gaza is not under Israeli jurisdiction. Hamas is in total control of the strip.

        I’m not defending the occupation of the West Bank, but it is technically legal. It was occupied from a hostile territory (Jordan) who used it to launch an attack on Israel in 1967, at Egypt’s behest. It is no longer claimed by Jordan, and no polity exists that could ensure the safety of Israeli civilians in the event of a withdrawal, so, for now, the occupation is Legal.

        What is illegal is not providing rights to the Arabs who live there, and the building of settlements. I’m highly critical of Israel for both of these issues. I love my country, but I’m not a “Israel-can-never-do-wrong” patriot. Settlements are a mistake. I don’t think they’re an excuse not to negotiate (Sinai and Gaza both had dozens of settlements what were dismantled for the sake of peace) but they’re certainly not convincing anyone of our good intentions either.

    2. Hannibal Avatar
      Hannibal

      I need to hear your opinion after you read this:
      http://www.theawl.com/2011/06/life-after-zionist-summer-camp
      Very curious about what you have to say.
      On another note, I do agree that every baby step forward is better than nothing. Hopefully the next generation will make peace happen.

      1. eblashko Avatar
        eblashko

        Hey, man. It’s cool you’re reading stuff like this. I read this already. It actually reminds me a lot of my mother, and of me. My mom is American, like the author, and also Jewish from the Midwest, not from New York (probably 75% of Jews in America live in the New York/New Jersey area). And like the author, she also always planned on making “aliyah” and did, but eventually returned to America with my Israeli father. And I grew up in New Jersey, and did the same thing, coming to Israel to join the army after college, now living here permanently.

        I definitely understand the author’s dilemma about being an American Jew or a Jewish American. I always identified myself with the former. I imagine it’s the same way that children from the Lebanese diaspora in America feel, if they’re Lebanese American or American Lebanese. But I still love America. And if people on this forum bashed America like they bashed Israel, you’d see me get just as defensive.

        Anyway, I guess I’m unmoved with this girl’s personal experience. She makes herself seem so passive. As if she’s influenced by her parents, then by her camp, then by her husband. Like she doesn’t have an original idea in her head.

        However, I would say on a whole, speaking about the Jews in America that her’s is a pretty good assessment. It’s hard to gauge, but the majority (75%?) of Jews do go to those Jewish camps and get reared in Zionist education. (Me and my brother always called them the “Jewy” kids). I don’t think it’s such a bad thing. As she said, it was never about violence or anything, just about heritage. Like I imagine some Hezbollah or Hamas schools are much worse, preaching resistance and martyrdom. She said she didn’t even know who the Palestinians were. And I never went to camp, but in Hebrew School (which I went to twice a week after school) we also never really talked about Palestinians… only about Israel.

        In America now, I hear something like 50% of Jews marry people who aren’t Jewish. For example, my mom is one of 4 siblings, each has 2 kids. So of the eight cousins, including myself, 4 are seriously dating non-Jews. 4 are dating Jews. But for the most part, these half-Jews children tend to strongly identify with their Jewish heritage and with Israel. For example, just like this author, my junior year of college, I studied in Israel and on my program of about 40 kids, 20ish where full Jews and 20ish were half Jews. There were even some half-Jewish American immigrants in the army with me. The reason for that I think is that the author is not so typical in marrying a anti-Zionist. Most non-Jews who marry Jews, like my with cousins for example, either are pro-Israel or don’t care either way. It’s funny too, I don’t know if you pick up on it or not, but the way the author writes about her husband, she makes him seem like kind of a tool, being disrespectful to her parents and her sister, and being scared of violence while visiting.

        Anyway, I’m very curious as to what YOU think of it? What did you take out of it?

        And about peace happening in the next generation, I’m holding out for this one. If Israel and Germany, Japan and America can make such strong friendships so few year after fighting to gruesomely, then why can’t we??

      2. eblashko Avatar
        eblashko

        So what’s the word, man? I’m so curious what you thought of it?

    3. 5thDrawer Avatar
      5thDrawer

      Isn’t there a ‘general fund’ in the United Nations for this sort of thing ??? 

  2.  Avatar
    Anonymous

    Just further proof for everyone who still says that Israel is supporting Assad.

    I love this guy! One of my favorite politicians in Israel. This is how you make peace with the Arabs. Not by signing treaties with their megalomaniac leaders, but by showing Arab PEOPLE that we’re not so bad.

    1. giving some food and water to 8,500 refugees does not offset the criminal occupation of 3 million Palestinians. I do not discount what this MK is trying to do, but I also do not give it the weight that you do.

      1.  Avatar
        Anonymous

         I’m not saying that he’s going to change the world. But every little bit helps.

        And by the way… occupation in itself is not illegal under international law. Settlements are. But occupation isn’t. And the number is more like 1.5 million.

        1. 1.5 million live in Gaza. The West Bank is also occupied. and not all occupation is legal, which is why my comment still stands…its a criminal occupation.

        2.  Avatar
          Anonymous

          That’s what you get for being nice and kiss their Tuches – They call you are a Criminal!!

      2.  Avatar
        Anonymous

         I’m not saying that he’s going to change the world. But every little bit helps.

        And by the way… occupation in itself is not illegal under international law. Settlements are. But occupation isn’t. And the number is more like 1.5 million.

      3.  Avatar
        Anonymous

        Yes, but we’re not occupying Gaza. We dismantled, both military and 10,000 civilian settlers, in 2005. Unlike the West Bank, Gaza is not under Israeli jurisdiction. Hamas is in total control of the strip.

        I’m not defending the occupation of the West Bank, but it is technically legal. It was occupied from a hostile territory (Jordan) who used it to launch an attack on Israel in 1967, at Egypt’s behest. It is no longer claimed by Jordan, and no polity exists that could ensure the safety of Israeli civilians in the event of a withdrawal, so, for now, the occupation is Legal.

        What is illegal is not providing rights to the Arabs who live there, and the building of settlements. I’m highly critical of Israel for both of these issues. I love my country, but I’m not a “Israel-can-never-do-wrong” patriot. Settlements are a mistake. I don’t think they’re an excuse not to negotiate (Sinai and Gaza both had dozens of settlements what were dismantled for the sake of peace) but they’re certainly not convincing anyone of our good intentions either.

    2. I need to hear your opinion after you read this:
      http://www.theawl.com/2011/06/life-after-zionist-summer-camp
      Very curious about what you have to say.
      On another note, I do agree that every baby step forward is better than nothing. Hopefully the next generation will make peace happen.

      1.  Avatar
        Anonymous

        Hey, man. It’s cool you’re reading stuff like this. I read this already. It actually reminds me a lot of my mother, and of me. My mom is American, like the author, and also Jewish from the Midwest, not from New York (probably 75% of Jews in America live in the New York/New Jersey area). And like the author, she also always planned on making “aliyah” and did, but eventually returned to America with my Israeli father. And I grew up in New Jersey, and did the same thing, coming to Israel to join the army after college, now living here permanently.

        I definitely understand the author’s dilemma about being an American Jew or a Jewish American. I always identified myself with the former. I imagine it’s the same way that children from the Lebanese diaspora in America feel, if they’re Lebanese American or American Lebanese. But I still love America. And if people on this forum bashed America like they bashed Israel, you’d see me get just as defensive.

        Anyway, I guess I’m unmoved with this girl’s personal experience. She makes herself seem so passive. As if she’s influenced by her parents, then by her camp, then by her husband. Like she doesn’t have an original idea in her head.

        However, I would say on a whole, speaking about the Jews in America that her’s is a pretty good assessment. It’s hard to gauge, but the majority (75%?) of Jews do go to those Jewish camps and get reared in Zionist education. (Me and my brother always called them the “Jewy” kids). I don’t think it’s such a bad thing. As she said, it was never about violence or anything, just about heritage. Like I imagine some Hezbollah or Hamas schools are much worse, preaching resistance and martyrdom. She said she didn’t even know who the Palestinians were. And I never went to camp, but in Hebrew School (which I went to twice a week after school) we also never really talked about Palestinians… only about Israel.

        In America now, I hear something like 50% of Jews marry people who aren’t Jewish. For example, my mom is one of 4 siblings, each has 2 kids. So of the eight cousins, including myself, 4 are seriously dating non-Jews. 4 are dating Jews. But for the most part, these half-Jews children tend to strongly identify with their Jewish heritage and with Israel. For example, just like this author, my junior year of college, I studied in Israel and on my program of about 40 kids, 20ish where full Jews and 20ish were half Jews. There were even some half-Jewish American immigrants in the army with me. The reason for that I think is that the author is not so typical in marrying a anti-Zionist. Most non-Jews who marry Jews, like my with cousins for example, either are pro-Israel or don’t care either way. It’s funny too, I don’t know if you pick up on it or not, but the way the author writes about her husband, she makes him seem like kind of a tool, being disrespectful to her parents and her sister, and being scared of violence while visiting.

        Anyway, I’m very curious as to what YOU think of it? What did you take out of it?

        And about peace happening in the next generation, I’m holding out for this one. If Israel and Germany, Japan and America can make such strong friendships so few year after fighting to gruesomely, then why can’t we??

      2.  Avatar
        Anonymous

        Hey, man. It’s cool you’re reading stuff like this. I read this already. It actually reminds me a lot of my mother, and of me. My mom is American, like the author, and also Jewish from the Midwest, not from New York (probably 75% of Jews in America live in the New York/New Jersey area). And like the author, she also always planned on making “aliyah” and did, but eventually returned to America with my Israeli father. And I grew up in New Jersey, and did the same thing, coming to Israel to join the army after college, now living here permanently.

        I definitely understand the author’s dilemma about being an American Jew or a Jewish American. I always identified myself with the former. I imagine it’s the same way that children from the Lebanese diaspora in America feel, if they’re Lebanese American or American Lebanese. But I still love America. And if people on this forum bashed America like they bashed Israel, you’d see me get just as defensive.

        Anyway, I guess I’m unmoved with this girl’s personal experience. She makes herself seem so passive. As if she’s influenced by her parents, then by her camp, then by her husband. Like she doesn’t have an original idea in her head.

        However, I would say on a whole, speaking about the Jews in America that her’s is a pretty good assessment. It’s hard to gauge, but the majority (75%?) of Jews do go to those Jewish camps and get reared in Zionist education. (Me and my brother always called them the “Jewy” kids). I don’t think it’s such a bad thing. As she said, it was never about violence or anything, just about heritage. Like I imagine some Hezbollah or Hamas schools are much worse, preaching resistance and martyrdom. She said she didn’t even know who the Palestinians were. And I never went to camp, but in Hebrew School (which I went to twice a week after school) we also never really talked about Palestinians… only about Israel.

        In America now, I hear something like 50% of Jews marry people who aren’t Jewish. For example, my mom is one of 4 siblings, each has 2 kids. So of the eight cousins, including myself, 4 are seriously dating non-Jews. 4 are dating Jews. But for the most part, these half-Jews children tend to strongly identify with their Jewish heritage and with Israel. For example, just like this author, my junior year of college, I studied in Israel and on my program of about 40 kids, 20ish where full Jews and 20ish were half Jews. There were even some half-Jewish American immigrants in the army with me. The reason for that I think is that the author is not so typical in marrying a anti-Zionist. Most non-Jews who marry Jews, like my with cousins for example, either are pro-Israel or don’t care either way. It’s funny too, I don’t know if you pick up on it or not, but the way the author writes about her husband, she makes him seem like kind of a tool, being disrespectful to her parents and her sister, and being scared of violence while visiting.

        Anyway, I’m very curious as to what YOU think of it? What did you take out of it?

        And about peace happening in the next generation, I’m holding out for this one. If Israel and Germany, Japan and America can make such strong friendships so few year after fighting to gruesomely, then why can’t we??

      3.  Avatar
        Anonymous

        So what’s the word, man? I’m so curious what you thought of it?

    3.  Avatar
      Anonymous

      Isn’t there a ‘general fund’ in the United Nations for this sort of thing ??? 

  3.  Avatar
    Anonymous

    Just further proof for everyone who still says that Israel is supporting Assad.

    I love this guy! One of my favorite politicians in Israel. This is how you make peace with the Arabs. Not by signing treaties with their megalomaniac leaders, but by showing Arab PEOPLE that we’re not so bad.

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