Trump storms out of a White House meeting after Pelosi said “no wall”

Few signs a government shutdown deal is near. President Donald Trump abruptly walked out of a closed-door meeting with congressional leaders Wednesday in the White House Situation Room after Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she wouldn't fund his border wall even if he ended the government shutdown.Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., (R) said, Trump slammed the table.'Then we have nothing to discuss' ...He just walked out of the meeting."
Few signs a government shutdown deal is near. President Donald Trump abruptly walked out of a closed-door meeting with congressional leaders Wednesday in the White House Situation Room after Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she wouldn’t fund his border wall even if he ended the government shutdown.Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., (R) said, Trump slammed the table.’Then we have nothing to discuss’ …He just walked out of the meeting.”

President Donald Trump abruptly walked out of a closed-door meeting with congressional leaders Wednesday in the White House Situation Room after Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she wouldn’t fund his border wall even if he ended the government shutdown.

“She said ‘No,'” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said, adding that Trump slammed the table. “He said, ‘Then we have nothing to discuss’ …He just walked out of the meeting.”

Trump quickly confirmed Schumer’s version of events in a tweet, making the details of the testy exchange the only thing the president and his Democratic counterparts could agree on in their fight over reopening a partially closed federal government and funding a border wall.

At one point, a congressional aide familiar with the meeting said, Schumer asked Trump why he wouldn’t open the government to relieve the suffering of Americans hurt by it.

“Because then you won’t give me what I want,” Trump responded, according to the aide.

White House officials described the president as calm during the meeting and one said afterward that he felt that he had called their bluff by offering to end the shutdown immediately if Democrats would agree to his border-security demands.

Several federal agencies have been shut down since Dec. 22. Trump has demanded that Congress include $7 billion in border security and humanitarian aid — including $5.7 billion in money for the wall — in any spending bill to re-open the parts of the government that have been shuttered for nearly three weeks.

As he met with Republican and Democratic leaders and Vice President Mike Pence, the White House issued a threat to veto a series of House spending bills that would open individual agencies because they don’t include money for the wall. The threat said Trump’s advisers “would recommend” that he veto the bills, rather than using the stronger language that the “president would” veto the bills that the Office of Management and Budget sometimes uses.

Pelosi opened her remarks after the meeting by describing the discussion as frigid.

“It’s cold out here, and the temperature wasn’t much warmer in the Situation Room,” she said outside the White House.

Pelosi cast Trump, the wealthy son of a real-estate developer, as insensitive to the plight of government workers who are due to miss paychecks this week.

“He thinks they could maybe just ask their father for more money, but they can’t,” she said.

Vice President Mike Pence said Trump has been clear about his priorities all along and that Republicans will “stand firm” on keeping the government shut down until Democrats agree to build the wall.

“There will be no deal without a wall,” Pence said. “There will be no deal without the priorities the president has put on the table.”

And, though Trump had just walked away from the actual negotiating table, Pence said Democrats “should come back to the table” to work on a plan to build the wall and fund the government.

Trump is scheduled to visit the southern border near McAllen, Texas, on Thursday, and he has said that he is considering declaring a national emergency to give himself greater authority to direct his administration to build a wall if Congress doesn’t appropriate money for that purpose.

The Pentagon, which undertakes military engineering and construction projects, has $4 billion in authority to transfer existing funds if the secretary of Defense deems such a move to be in the “national interest” — regardless of whether the president declares an emergency. But there are conditions on shifting the money around that could turn the maneuver into a major political and legal fightbetween Congress and the White House.

NBC
  • Niemals

    Trump abruptly walked out of a closed-door meeting with congressional leaders and added new tweets that reflects his mental state https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/9fffbc192e07e578388a4c164a96a24115e77795c06e5af992c21d3ec1f75e53.jpg “Fake News Media working in overdrive to make the story look otherwise.”

    He seizes every straw that can help him from the abyss, Trump have new way to twitter…. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b5c9e320b59f00dda86a8d9d33530e2185eb71bd8c18714dd87c61a4ed8e70fd.jpg Trump is retweeting as the eternal Jew hater Rosette Rohana Boisvert do it.

  • Hind Abyad

    Ex-IDF chief reveals Israeli military secrets in TV interview-

    “Maj. Gen. (res.) Yitzhak Brick retired this week after serving as the
    Israel Defence Forces ombudsman for over a decade. Before his
    departure, Brick got into a spat with the Israeli military’s top brass
    after publishing a thorough report suggesting that Israel’s ground
    forces were grossly unprepared for a major conflict.

    Brick continued his barrage of criticism against the military
    over its allegedly catastrophic readiness levels on Wednesday, the day
    he was replaced by former defence comptroller Eitan Dahan.

    “If there is a war, the trauma of Yom Kippur will be a walk in the park in comparison, Brick said, speaking to Israeli television.

    Brick was referring to the October War of 1973 between Israel and a
    coalition of Arab states, which brought Israel to the brink of defeat
    and nearly sparked a wider war between the United States and the Soviet
    Union, whom supported opposite sides in the conflict.

    According to the officer, Israel is currently
    “building the army into a situation where it can give an answer to two
    threats: Lebanon and Gaza. There seems to have been a change in the
    Middle East, the Syrians have returned. The main threat that has not
    been taken into consideration is near us. Our army is built for a
    region-and-a-half.”

    “How do you build an army without taking changes in the Middle East
    into consideration? It’s irresponsible at a national level,” Brick
    added.

    The retired official said his mission
    as ombudsman had been to ‘burst the bubble’ of the IDF’s illusions. “The
    deepest secret of the army, that they do everything to keep safe, is
    that what happens in the army stays there. They have been doing it
    with amazing success until today, until this Brick comes and bursts the
    bubble,” Brick said.

    Prior to his retirement, Brick repeatedly
    criticised the military over what he perceived as its dangerous
    unpreparedness for war. Last June, he cited an acute shortage of doctors
    and psychiatrists, as well as cost-cutting measures, which he said had a negative effect on the morale of young officers and NCOs.

    Brick blamed these flaws on the 2015
    five-year reform strategy, which proposed reducing the number of career
    soldiers to less than 40,000, and reduced compulsory military service
    by three months for men. These changes resulted in burnout and the loss
    of motivation among the remaining officers, according to the ombudsman.

    A Knesset investigation challenged Brick’s
    findings, concluding late last year that the army was in good shape and
    that operational preparedness had actually “significantly improved”
    since the 2014 Gaza war.

    Israel had the 14th largest defence
    expenditure in the world in 2017, spending $21.6 billion, far
    outstripping most regional competitors, including traditional foe Syria,
    which spent $1.87 billion, and Iran, which spent $6.3 billion,
    according to Global Firepower.

    Israel is also believed to possess
    between 80 and 400 nuclear warheads, although its official policy is not
    to confirm or deny its possession of such arms.

    Israel has been involved in 14 conflicts
    in its 71-year history, including wars with Arab states, as well
    as limited conflicts with militant groups such as the Palestinian
    Liberation Organisation (PLO), Hezbollah and Hamas.”

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    “If there is a war, the trauma of Yom Kippur will be a walk in the park in comparison, Brick said, speaking to Israeli television.

    Brick was referring to the October War of 1973 between Israel and a
    coalition of Arab states, which brought Israel to the brink of defeat
    and nearly sparked a wider war between the United States and the Soviet
    Union, whom supported opposite sides in the conflict.

    According to the officer, Israel is currently
    “building the army into a situation where it can give an answer to two
    threats: Lebanon and Gaza. There seems to have been a change in the
    Middle East, the Syrians have returned. The main threat that has not
    been taken into consideration is near us. Our army is built for a
    region-and-a-half.”

    “How do you build an army without taking changes in the Middle East
    into consideration? It’s irresponsible at a national level,” Brick
    added.

    The retired official said his mission
    as ombudsman had been to ‘burst the bubble’ of the IDF’s illusions. “The
    deepest secret of the army, that they do eve