Will Syria’s Strife Rip Lebanon Apart?

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lebanon syria flagsThe assassination of Lebanese security chief brigadier general Wissam Hassan on October 19 has rekindled fears of renewed confessional strife in Lebanon. The anti-Assad opposition quickly blamed the Syrian regime for eliminating one of its foremost Beirut opponents while enraged demonstrators took to the streets to demand the resignation of prime minister Najib Miqati.[1]

Yet while the persistence and intensification of the Syrian civil war has undoubtedly amplified Lebanese instability and placed the country’s fate on the edge, the assassination is unlikely to “drag Lebanon into the fray.”[2] Western countries, Saudi Arabia, and Iran are not interested in destabilizing Lebanon, and Syria has lost its ability to manipulate its neighbor’s internal affairs.

The tables have turned, and it is Syria’s time to suffer. Despite their deep ideological divisions, the Lebanese appear to have come of age and learned to prevent their differences from reaching the point of open confrontation.

Economic Costs for Lebanon

While the Lebanese government stays officially neutral in the current Syrian civil war, its various confessional groups surreptitiously seek to support one side or another in the fighting. The Sierra Leone-registered Lutfallah II was detained by the Lebanese navy for illegally transporting arms and ammunition, seen here, to Syrian rebels.

The Syrian conflict has thus far caused greater economic difficulties than political ones for Lebanon, especially in the investment, banking, tourist, and agricultural sectors. Fearing a Syrian spillover, some Persian Gulf entrepreneurs are refraining from investing in the Lebanese market, which depends on these investments to plug its current account deficit estimated at $5.6 billion (or 14.4 percent of the country’s gross domestic product).[3]

According to economist Muhammad Shamseddine, Lebanon has become “Syria’s backyard in circumventing Western trade and banking sanctions against it.”[4] Riad Salame, governor of the Central Bank of Lebanon, acknowledged the adverse impact of the situation in Syria on Lebanese banks, which are by far the country’s most important economic sector. He reports that seven Lebanese banks with branches in Syria “have taken provisions based on stress tests of about $380 million in anticipation of loans that could not be repaid.”[5]

Realistically, Beirut cannot completely implement European and U.S. sanctions on Syria since Damascus can retaliate and choke off Lebanon’s substantial exports to the Persian Gulf by closing its land borders. In addition, Syria has strong allies in Lebanon who can easily ignore cabinet decisions to comply with the sanctions.

The crisis in Syria and the state of tension in Lebanon have had a negative effect on the latter’s tourist sector. Visitors from the Persian Gulf states and Jordan have stopped coming to Lebanon via Syria. A further crippling blow to tourism occurred when angry rioters in the predominantly Shiite suburbs of Beirut threatened to kidnap gulf tourists in response to the abduction of a Lebanese Shiite in Damascus by the Free Syrian Army (FSA). The Gulf Cooperation Council reacted by ordering their subjects to refrain from travelling to Lebanon, causing the loss of seven billion dollars in expected revenues.[6]

The Politics of Dissociation

The Assad regime also sought to link the fate of Lebanon to the vicissitudes of the Syrian crisis so as to prevent its transformation into an anti-Syrian hotbed. Damascus ruled out the possibility that Saad Hariri would return to the premiership, insisting instead on Miqati’s appointment to that post in June 2011. The Syrian uprising was just beginning at that time, and the Assad regime still held important political assets in Lebanon. But as soon as it became clear that the Syrian uprising was not going to end soon, Miqati opted for officially dissociating Lebanon from the crisis, appealing for Arab countries’ help in shoring up Beirut against the untoward developments next door.[7]

However, the official position of the Lebanese government does not usually mean much in view of its inherent weakness vis-à-vis the disproportionate strength of the major sects. Groups such as the Iranian-created and backed Hezbollah, former Sunni prime minister Saad Hariri’s Saudi-patronized Future Trend, the anti-Syrian Christian nationalist Lebanese Forces, the Progressive Socialist Party (PSP) of maverick Druze leader Walid Jumblatt, and the pragmatic and secularizing Shiite Amal Movement have actually transformed Lebanon into a major regional political actor in relation to this crisis, an unprecedented development that has turned the relationship between the two countries upside down. The Syrian patron for nearly forty years has suddenly splintered into warring factions working with the former Lebanese clients on an equal footing.

Much to the chagrin of the pro-Assad Lebanese army command, Lebanese Sunnis have provided a major base of support for the FSA. A Lebanese army bulletin cautioned against efforts to infiltrate its ranks and implicate it in regional issues.[8] This stern warning by army commander Jean Qahwaji came after intelligence agents arrested a Sunni officer and several civilian accomplices affiliated with Hariri’s Future Trend on grounds of stealing weapons from an army depot and giving them to the FSA.[9] Rifaat Eid, secretary general of the historically Alawite-based Arab Democratic Party, accused the Future Trend of training and arming members of the FSA in Tripoli and blamed it for vandalizing Alawite property in the city.[10]

Eid’s accusations were not isolated. The Syrian regime has, since the beginning of the uprising, regularly charged the Future Trend with arms smuggling. Syrian ambassador to Lebanon, Ali Abdulkarim, reiterated his country’s frustration over the failure of the Miqati government to curtail the Future Trend’s sponsorship and support of arms smuggling, which he said violated the prime minister’s dissociation policy.[11] The Russian foreign ministry spokesman, Alexander Lukashevich, corroborated these charges and called upon the U.N. Security Council to put an end to arms smuggling from Lebanon to Syria. He referred to the Syria-bound ship, Lutfallah II, intercepted by the Lebanese navy in April 2012 en route to Tripoli and laden with arms for the rebels.[12]

Meanwhile, Lebanese armed forces chief Qahwaji has not responded to Syrian incursions and frequent shelling of Lebanese border villages while military intelligence operatives have abducted many anti-Assad Syrian activists and handed them over to the authorities in Damascus.[13] In response to its collusion with Syrian government forces, the Lebanese army has lost its legitimacy in the eyes of most Lebanese Sunnis who have ceased to consider it “an embodiment of the country’s unity.”[14] Although Hariri has consistently denied any involvement in arms smuggling to Syria, he never hid his desire to see the Assad regime fall. In fact, Future Trend spokespersons have repeatedly expressed their strong belief that Assad’s exit from the political scene is unavoidable. Echoing a similar perspective by other leaders in the anti-Syrian March 14 coalition, Samir Jea’jea, leader of the Lebanese Forces Party has declared that it was “only a matter of time before the Syrian revolution triumphs.” He has distanced himself from the pro-Assad position of Lebanese Maronite patriarch Bishara al-Ra’i and reminded coreligionists that “Assad had broken the back of Lebanese Christians.”[15] Likewise, in an interview with a Saudi newspaper, Butrus Harb, a parliamentary deputy affiliated with the March 14 coalition, accused the Syrian regime of attempting to assassinate him in collusion with its local allies. He said the regime in Damascus “has launched a campaign of sabotaging Lebanon’s peace.”[16]

Hezbollah and Its Rivals

The Syrian uprising—which has inspired Lebanese Sunnis and partially militarized them—has placed Hezbollah in an awkward position. The succession of events in the region does not augur well for its future as Tehran’s forward military division. Hezbollah has been actively involved in the fighting on the Assad regime’s side since the beginning of the uprising but in a relatively subdued fashion.

In May 2012, a confrontation between Hezbollah and the FSA occurred over the abduction of Lebanese Shiite “pilgrims” near Aleppo, allegedly working on behalf of the Syrian regime. Then in August, a member of the Lebanese Shiite al-Miqdad clan was kidnapped and identified by the FSA as a Hezbollah sniper fighting on the side of Syrian government troops. The clan responded by announcing the formation of a military wing and launching a counter abduction campaign against Syrian laborers in Lebanon. While releasing two of the “pilgrims,” the FSA demanded an apology from Hezbollah head Hassan Nasrallah as a precondition for releasing the rest.[17] Instead, Nasrallah threatened to declare war on the FSA. In October 2012, Hezbollah publicly announced for the first time the death of a number of its men during a “jihadist mission” in Syria.[18]

Despite its close affinity with the Assad regime and its occasional bellicosity, Hezbollah includes elements that are keen on preventing the war in Syria from spilling over into Lebanon. Damascus seems determined to spread chaos into Lebanon as a means of convincing the international community that other countries in the region are not impervious to the crisis. Former Hezbollah chief Subhi al-Tufaili pointed out that the Syrian regime made no secret of its expectation “that the entire region would go on fire unless the country’s uprising is halted.”[19] He criticized Nasrallah for taking the wrong side in the Syrian crisis: “The position of Hezbollah is subjecting Lebanese Shiites to retribution after the fall of the Syrian regime.”[20]

Paul Salem of the Carnegie Middle East Center expressed concern that the demise of the Assad regime might render Hezbollah impotent and invite a crippling Israeli military operation against Lebanon.[21] According to the Kuwaiti paper Al-Anba, Hezbollah is going through an existential crisis because “its strength does not emanate from the vast array of weapons it possesses, but from the regional function it performs on behalf of Iran and the Syrian regime.” The paper notes that Hezbollah is aware of its predicament, which simultaneously encourages Speaker of the House and rival Amal Movement leader Nabih Berri to “attempt to seize the limelight from his Shiite rival group.”[22]

Hezbollah is not oblivious to the quandary in which it finds itself. Shortly after the Shiite kidnappings, angry demonstrations broke out in the southern Shiite suburbs of Beirut in protest over these events, disrupting normal operations of the nearby Beirut international airport.[23] Surprisingly, Hezbollah invited the Lebanese army to restore law and order in the area. Clearly embarrassed, Muhammad Fneish, a member in Hezbollah’s parliamentary bloc, told the Future Trend’s flagship media outlet that the party “is not responsible for the demonstrators’ disturbance of the public peace, and invites the state to shoulder its responsibilities.”[24]

While Hezbollah aims to give a helping hand to Assad’s forces without reigniting Lebanon’s civil war, its rivals find themselves playing similar games. In August 2012, a Lebanese military tribunal indicted Ali Mamluk, head of the Syrian National Security Bureau, and Michel Samaha, former Lebanese parliament member and cabinet minister, on grounds of conspiracy to set off explosive devices in Lebanon and trigger civil war.[25] Despite the damning evidence that implicated the Syrian government, Prime Minister Miqati’s criticism was mild and did not refer to the Assad regime by name.[26] President Michel Suleiman then instructed the minister of foreign affairs, Hussein Mansour, to hand the Syrian ambassador a memorandum of protest. Mansour, a member of the pro-Syrian Shiite Amal Movement, refused and instead sent the ambassador an apparently innocuous memorandum. When asked by a reporter to justify his mild response, he said: “There are no hard feelings between our two sister countries.”[27]

Nabih Berri, Amal’s leader, has remained mostly quiet on the developments in Syria, neither praising the Syrian regime nor criticizing the opposition, delegating these tasks to second tier members of the movement. Berri seems to be betting on Assad’s eventual departure from the scene and is thus seeking to secure for himself a leading role in Lebanese politics in the post-Assad period. This calculation appears to view Assad’s exit as an opportunity to weaken the position of his Shiite rival, Hezbollah.

Similarly, Walid Jumblatt, who leads the predominantly Druze Progressive Socialist Party, did not deny that the Syrian crisis had created discord in Lebanon although he refused to call it “a Sunni vs. Shiite division.”[28] He recognized the threat of the Syrian situation to Lebanese stability but expressed confidence that the rival factions were “managing their differences and keeping them civil.”[29] Following the extradition of fourteen anti-regime, Syrian activists to Damascus, Jumblatt led a successful drive to discontinue this practice. His tough stand on the matter generated a heated debate in Lebanon and drove Western ambassadors to demand granting asylum and accommodation to Syrian activists and refugees. The U.S. ambassador in Lebanon, Maura Conelly, expressed her country’s deep concern over the deportation of Syrian refugees “and demanded providing them with refuge, in keeping with Lebanon’s humanitarian responsibilities.”[30] Jumblatt continued to denounce Assad and implore the Druze in Syria to join the uprising but eschewed revolutionary change in Syrian politics in favor of Assad stepping down in a Yemeni-type exit akin to that of Ali Abdullah Saleh. He apparently prefers the introduction of an accommodationist political system in Syria, in which the political rights of its minority groups, including the Druze, would be safeguarded.

Conclusion

While the Assad regime continues to wield significant, if decreasing, political, security, and economic influence on its small and polarized neighbor, it is not likely that it can shape the course of events there. If anything, Syria’s domestic troubles offer the Lebanese people a rare opportunity to work out their differences without outside manipulation and usher in a new era in national politics in which foreign powers do not continually play one ethnic group against another.

Washington appears committed to preventing the collapse of security in Lebanon as a result of the raging conflict in Syria. Ambassador Conelly reiterated the “U.S. commitment to a stable, sovereign, and independent Lebanon.”[31] It is in this context that one can understand the sudden display of resolution and might by the Lebanese army in responding to security breaches in the southern suburbs and in Tripoli. The existing modus operandi is to respond to the Syrian crisis by officially observing neutrality without obstructing the country’s two major political coalitions from supporting the faction of their choice across the border.[32]

In response to the Hassan assassination and attendant calls for Miqati’s resignation, the French ambassador rushed to President Suleiman to emphasize the importance of allowing the government to “continue performing its duties.”[33] His British counterpart, who also talked to the president right after the assassination, echoed the same position: “The best response is … through solidarity, unity, and resilience.”[34] With the army swiftly containing the sporadic skirmishes in Beirut and Tripoli and President Suleiman urging Miqati to “stay on in the national interest,”[35] the predictions of a renewed Lebanese civil war seem largely premature.

By Hilal Khashan

Professor of political science at the American University of Beirut.

[1] See, for example, Max Fisher, “Why Wissam al-Hassan Matters for the Middle East,” The Washington Post, Oct. 19, 2012; Mike Giglio, “Does the assassination of Wissam al-Hassan reopen a bloody chapter of Lebanon’s past?” The Daily Beast, Oct. 20, 2012.

[2] Tess deBlanc-Knowles, “Syrian Conflict: Lebanon at Risk,” Institute for National Security Studies, National Defense University, Washington, D.C., Mar. 20, 2012.

[3] Al-Arabiya News Channel (Dubai), July 25, 2012.

[4] “Riyah ar-Rabi al-Arabi: Lubnan wal Iraq yushakilan as-Suq al-Wahid lil iqtisad as-Suri,” Iktissadiat, Aug. 26, 2012.

[5] The Daily Star (Beirut), July 12, 2012.

[6] An-Nahar (Beirut), June 20, 2012.

[7] Al-Jazeera TV (Doha), Dec. 10, 2010.

[8] “Orientation Bulletin,” no. 1/2012, Lebanese Army, Mar. 9, 2012.

[9] Al-Akhbar (Beirut), Apr. 10, 2012.

[10] El-Nashra (Beirut), June 13, 2012.

[11] Tishrin (Damascus), Aug. 24, 2012.

[12] Al-Balad (Beirut), May 12, 2012.

[13] Now Lebanon (Beirut), Aug. 2, 2012.

[14] Ibrahim al-Amin, al-Akhbar, May 21, 2012.

[15] MTV (Beirut), Mar. 12, 2012.

[16] Okaz (Riyadh), July 18, 2012.

[17] Naharnet news website (Beirut), Aug. 26, 2012.

[18] Ibid., Oct. 2, 2012.

[19] Saidaonline (Sidon, Leb.), Aug. 22, 2012.

[20] Al-Watan (Doha), Sept. 30, 2012.

[21] “Taqyim Ttada’iyat al-Azma as-Suriyya ‘ala Lubnan fi markaz Carnegie lil sharq al-awsat fi Beirut,” Carnegie Middle East Center, Beirut, June 25, 2012.

[22] Al-Anba (Kuwait), Aug. 24, 2012.

[23] Al-Jazeera TV, May 23, 2012.

[24] Al-Mustaqbal (Beirut), Aug. 17, 2012.

[25] Ibid., Aug. 10, 2012.

[26] Levant News (Beirut), Aug. 13, 2012.

[27] An-Nahar (Beirut), July 26, 2012.

[28] Al-Rai (Kuwait City), June 3, 2012.

[29] Ibid.

[30] An-Nahar, Aug. 2, 2012.

[31] Embassy of the United States, Beirut, news release, Oct. 4, 2012.

[32] Ad-Diyar (Beirut), June 18, 2012.

[33] Lebanese Broadcasting Corporation, Oct. 20, 2012.

[34] Embassy of the United Kingdom, Beirut, news release, Oct. 20, 2012.

[35] BBC News, Oct. 21, 2012.

First Published in Lebanon Wire

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Comments

122 responses to “Will Syria’s Strife Rip Lebanon Apart?”

  1. 5thDrawer Avatar
    5thDrawer

    ‘Confessional strife’ … in a country where no-one confesses … interesting concept.

    1. hariri assaoudi Avatar
      hariri assaoudi

      i dont think you do confess either; not usual for an atheist

      1. 5thDrawer Avatar
        5thDrawer

        Dork … again.

        1. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
          Hariri Assaoudi

          pork

      2. MekensehParty Avatar
        MekensehParty

        is atheist meant to be an insult?

        1. 5thDrawer Avatar
          5thDrawer

          In his mind, I guess so Mekenseh. 😉
          I may have touched on my own beliefs here a little … although they are no-one’s business anyway … and I guess they are just not ‘up’ high enough in the sky for some. Oh well.

          1. MekensehParty Avatar
            MekensehParty

            5th drawer, whether you’re an atheist or not, you have JC’s teachings in your heart when you’re so kind to those who mean you harm. It’s so nice of you to say that Hariri assaoudi has a “mind” when everybody knows, himself included, that he speaks from his @$$.

          2. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            nope mr hollis; its only when you are here that i fart; you are fartogenic and diarrheogenic

          3. MekensehParty Avatar
            MekensehParty

            more words from the @$$
            don’t you see that you’re proving my point?
            I guess not, you need a brain for that

          4. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            atheist is not an insult in my mind at all; the insult starts when an atheist becomes as fanatical as a salafi; as far asas your own belief being nones other business, well, you keep on attacking the radical sunna and salafis beliefs but you support their poolitical stance in syria

          5. 5thDrawer Avatar
            5thDrawer

            Mr Assoudi … if I intrigue you so well … (the me, the id, the inner self, whatever)
            Within the confines of ‘laws of any country’ in which I may find myself – as asinine as many are in literally every country – I most disagree with the ‘radicals’ which constantly threaten not only societal infrastructure, but a personal freedom to choose a life-style not damaging any other in it’s efforts to be. (to exist)

            I will ALSO try to avoid political idiots – but DO believe SOME really try to ‘do it right’ – for all – even if no-one is perfect.
            What indeed do I ‘support’? Life.
            Mentally, I have always been a ‘rebel’. Anything which has placed restrictions on my desire to do things I love to do or on people I wish to meet and talk to or on a physical movement for discovery of a planet that interests me, I rail against. Always.
            I was lucky to have parents who attempted to lead well by example, but didn’t forbid curiosity or a natural desire to be an ‘individual’.
            (And poor Mom gave up on trying to force in certain foods as well.)

            I learned (just as well I guess) to work with people, and to survive with the often-stupid ‘rules and politics’ of work-life, in a ‘job’ I chose and actually enjoyed doing. But the purpose of ‘work’ was to allow me to live. Doing work well was with that purpose in mind. I look back and see I did ‘well enough’ in that, yet feel I never managed to pack as much ‘living’ as I wished into life either. I can move well enough in several levels of ‘social strata’, as I both studied them and have various experiences over a lifetime, but DO have a preference of which I feel comfortable with. One is allowed to discriminate in that – and there are some I have moved away from as well – one can change.
            Some levels also change – or the friends in them disappear.
            I recognize a passage of time … the ONLY thing which should restrict any individual.
            Time should be our only enemy. (aside from the bugs ..) If I waste it, that is my problem. If some idiot begins to put road-blocks into my personal time to restrict how I WISH to use it, then – by one method or another – I will find the way around him. I attempt to find the ‘right way’ – always did – probably because I have no great desire to lessen whatever time I may have. Understanding ‘the rules’ (especially in any given location) can be important when deciding ‘the way’, of course. One must apply ‘reason’.
            Usually ripping out a throat never seemed quite right … and not now, since running fast enough afterward has become less certain at my age. 🙂
            Generally a quiet man … ‘Yon Cassius’ with the lean and hungry look. 😉
            But I was never afraid to say what I think. I do have my own opinions – although I may have been careful where to mouth them at times.
            Eyes OPEN.

            And then ‘man’ invented BLOG. Oh wowowowoowwie.
            Screw all those who expect me to think like them, and who wish to control me, no matter what ‘belief system’ they have for themselves.
            I am much more ‘radical’ than they know.

            And by the way … that interesting genetic stuff?
            Don’t let anyone tell you that you can pass ‘it’ on to kids. Sigh. Mine you might say ‘fit well’ … even if they had earfulls from me. But I allowed them the freedom my parents allowed me … they will say what they think always as well.
            We ARE all individuals. Try to live with that.

          6. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            you do not intrigue me at all; you are an open book; being the one spending more time than anybody else on this blog, it is normal for me to stumble on you frequently; but as you noticed, even if you step on my foot, i learnt this from the brits in 1988 when i was there, “i say sorry”; your life story seems to be interesting hence my suggestion, instead of allowing idiots make you lose time on an idiot blog as i understood from your text, maybe and why not write your autobiography, and by the same token, probably the postmortem one of hariri junior; as far as genotypes and phenotypes are concerned i believe nurture is more important than nature though in some cases, like the saoudis, i think nature, by selecting over centuries the fittest trait for their survival, made the saoudis more stupid than their camels; allez, to be nice with them, as intelligent than their camels. Last but not least, even though i am probably the most attacked on this blog, yet, i am satisfied that many, consciously or unconsciously, are adopting my neophrasology, hence i presume, in the same way i am subliminally influencing linguistically, i may have a deep but obvious only in a very subtle way, a deep influence on the way some hariri robots think

        2. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
          Hariri Assaoudi

          did you cure your prostate cancer?

  2. 5thDrawer Avatar
    5thDrawer

    ‘Confessional strife’ … in a country where no-one confesses … interesting concept.

    1. hariri assaoudi Avatar
      hariri assaoudi

      i dont think you do confess either; not usual for an atheist

        1. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
          Hariri Assaoudi

          pork

      1. MekensehParty Avatar
        MekensehParty

        is atheist meant to be an insult?

        1. 5thDrawer Avatar
          5thDrawer

          In his mind, I guess so Mekenseh. 😉
          I may have touched on my own beliefs here a little … although they are no-one’s business anyway … and I guess they are just not ‘up’ high enough in the sky for some. Oh well.

          1. MekensehParty Avatar
            MekensehParty

            5th drawer, whether you’re an atheist or not, you have JC’s teachings in your heart when you’re so kind to those who mean you harm. It’s so nice of you to say that Hariri assaoudi has a “mind” when everybody knows, himself included, that he speaks from his @$$.

          2. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            nope mr hollis; its only when you are here that i fart; you are fartogenic and diarrheogenic

          3. MekensehParty Avatar
            MekensehParty

            more words from the @$$
            don’t you see that you’re proving my point?
            I guess not, you need a brain for that

          4. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            atheist is not an insult in my mind at all; the insult starts when an atheist becomes as fanatical as a salafi; as far asas your own belief being nones other business, well, you keep on attacking the radical sunna and salafis beliefs but you support their poolitical stance in syria

          5. 5thDrawer Avatar
            5thDrawer

            Mr Assoudi … if I intrigue you so well … (the me, the id, the inner self, whatever)
            Within the confines of ‘laws of any country’ in which I may find myself – as asinine as many are in literally every country – I most disagree with the ‘radicals’ which constantly threaten not only societal infrastructure, but a personal freedom to choose a life-style not damaging any other in it’s efforts to be. (to exist)

            I will ALSO try to avoid political idiots – but DO believe SOME really try to ‘do it right’ – for all – even if no-one is perfect.
            What indeed do I ‘support’? Life.
            Mentally, I have always been a ‘rebel’. Anything which has placed restrictions on my desire to do things I love to do or on people I wish to meet and talk to or on a physical movement for discovery of a planet that interests me, I rail against. Always.
            I was lucky to have parents who attempted to lead well by example, but didn’t forbid curiosity or a natural desire to be an ‘individual’.
            (And poor Mom gave up on trying to force in certain foods as well.)

            I learned (just as well I guess) to work with people, and to survive with the often-stupid ‘rules and politics’ of work-life, in a ‘job’ I chose and actually enjoyed doing. But the purpose of ‘work’ was to allow me to live. Doing work well was with that purpose in mind. I look back and see I did ‘well enough’ in that, yet feel I never managed to pack as much ‘living’ as I wished into life either. I can move well enough in several levels of ‘social strata’, as I both studied them and have various experiences over a lifetime, but DO have a preference of which I feel comfortable with. One is allowed to discriminate in that – and there are some I have moved away from as well – one can change.
            Some levels also change – or the friends in them disappear.
            I recognize a passage of time … the ONLY thing which should restrict any individual.
            Time should be our only enemy. (aside from the bugs ..) If I waste it, that is my problem. If some idiot begins to put road-blocks into my personal time to restrict how I WISH to use it, then – by one method or another – I will find the way around him. I attempt to find the ‘right way’ – always did – probably because I have no great desire to lessen whatever time I may have. Understanding ‘the rules’ (especially in any given location) can be important when deciding ‘the way’, of course. One must apply ‘reason’.
            Usually ripping out a throat never seemed quite right … and not now, since running fast enough afterward has become less certain at my age. 🙂
            Generally a quiet man … ‘Yon Cassius’ with the lean and hungry look. 😉
            But I was never afraid to say what I think. I do have my own opinions – although I may have been careful where to mouth them at times.
            Eyes OPEN.

            And then ‘man’ invented BLOG. Oh wowowowoowwie.
            Screw all those who expect me to think like them, and who wish to control me, no matter what ‘belief system’ they have for themselves.
            I am much more ‘radical’ than they know.

            And by the way … that interesting genetic stuff?
            Don’t let anyone tell you that you can pass ‘it’ on to kids. Sigh. Mine you might say ‘fit well’ … even if they had earfulls from me. But I allowed them the freedom my parents allowed me … they will say what they think always as well.
            We ARE all individuals. Try to live with that.

          6. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            you do not intrigue me at all; you are an open book; being the one spending more time on anybody else on this blog, it is normal for me to stumble on you frequently; but as you noticed, even if you step on my foot, i learnt this from the brits in 1988 when i was there “i say sorry”; your life story seems to be interesting hence my suggestion, instead of allowing idiots make you lose time on a stupid blog as i understood from your text, maybe and why not write your autobiography, and probably the postmortem one of hariri junior; as far as genotypes and phenotypes are concerned i believe nurture is more important than nature though in some cases, like the saoudis, i think nature, by selecting the fittest trait for their survival, made the saoudis more stupid than their camels; allez, to be nice with them, as intelligent than their camels. Last but not least, even though i am probably the most attacked on this blog, yet, i am satisfied that many are adopting my neophrasology, hence i presume, by the same token i am subliminally influencing linguistically, i may have a deep but obvious only in a very subtle way, a deep influence on the way some hariri robots think

        2. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
          Hariri Assaoudi

          did you cure your prostate cancer?

  3. hariri assaoudi Avatar
    hariri assaoudi

    is this a suggestion or a wishful thinking?

  4. hariri assaoudi Avatar
    hariri assaoudi

    is this a suggestion or a wishful thinking?

  5. wargame1 Avatar

    Lebanon is a part of Syria so it will be a part of Syria again inshallah,

    1. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
      Hariri Assaoudi

      you meant syria is a lebanese province, big one maybe but arrierated by salafism; we might take back wadi al nassara, we will give part of syria to the druze, the shia will add some of the border areas, the kurds will take their part in kamishli, israel already took its part, the alawis will take their part and the rest will be a salafi palestinian state after adding jordan to it; believe you me your allah is impotent and cannot change this; all your allah can do is when you curse others by saying “allahouma ouktol al kouffar, allahoumma kill their children…..” but your allahoumma is deaf; 3alehom ya 3arab, ya nawar, ya tatar

      1. IraniAngel Avatar
        IraniAngel

        in that case whats left of syria to the disgusting salafists is the desert. in fact i think the desert and all the lizards living there are what they aspire for the simple reason that they are nothing more than a bunch of lizard eaters. if you know the saudis you know what i am talking about and it turns out that the lizard is the national dish of KSA.. it is a delicatessen which they enjoy 24/7.. for breakfast, for lunch, for brunch, for crunch, for dinner, and when they are up late and they feel like having a midnight snack they serve lizards as well

    2. Hannibal Avatar

      What would you do with the majority of Lebanese who want an independent Lebanon? Kill them all? Using moslem swords? I for one am Lebanese and I do not want that union. I hate their accent and their way of life and do not like to be a part of a greater Syria. Let us put it to a vote.

      1. I second that, If he wants to be a Syrian he can leave the way he came…. 80% of Lebanon at least is Christian and Shia if they ever put it at a vote it will never happen. Syrians work for us in Lebanon for $20 a day lmaooo literately I had 10 Syrians doing heavy lifting work all day for $20 dollars… It’s like the USA wanting to join with Mexico…..

    3. MekensehParty Avatar
      MekensehParty

      The Golan, South Lebanon, the West Bank and Sinai are part of the Kingdom of Judah and they will be part of Israel again אִם יִרְצֶה הַשֵּׁם

      All the Mediterranean basin is part of the Roman Empire and they will be Italian again – God’s willing
      I can go on forever…

      1. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
        Hariri Assaoudi

        oops i just farted

        1. Patience2 Avatar
          Patience2

          We knew.

          1. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            you seem to know a lot of useless things; one thing you do not know is that if you smell shit it means you are leaking or that you are incontinent

          2. Patience2 Avatar
            Patience2

            Or, you are standing next to Mr. Har-di.

    4. Prophettttt Avatar
      Prophettttt

      Sure, Lebanon can annex Syria and we’ll have a “Greater Lebanon” lol
      Sooner or later we’ll annex Palestine as well,and then we’ll a secular “Lebanese empire”,lol

      1. I am down with that 🙂

      2. 5thDrawer Avatar
        5thDrawer

        Trade-wise, that worked rather well for most people, until the Romans filled in the ocean to ‘conquer’ Tyre.
        Oh … just had a mental picture … can you imagine what arrow-fodder the guys placing the last stones must have been? 😉

        1. Patience2 Avatar
          Patience2

          Don’t forget the ‘Roman Turtle’, or, maybe that particular one could’ve been called the ‘Roman Porcupine’?

      3. Patience2 Avatar
        Patience2

        So, let Syria be: Lebanon’s Backyard !!

    5. libnan1 Avatar

      I encourage you and all Sunnis in Lebanon to do a noble thing by going to Syria and fighting for a “greater Syria”. That would be the best thing you can do, we can provide transportation.

      1. Transportation to hell!

      2. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
        Hariri Assaoudi

        did you tell him the salafis are paying 1000 syrian pound per day per moujahid testicle ie if the moujahid has two testicles he will get 2000 a day; the saudi kingdom provides the testicular shield to protect the genitalia upon committing suicidal bombing to kill the alawi kouffar; mind you, it is difficult to find a moujahid with testicles, because if they had the balls in the right place, they wouldnt commit suicide to get sex; they would have real sex on earth

    6. Syria can stay the hell hole it is becoming without Lebanon we have nothing to do with them its there internal conflict. If they seek refuge that’s fine but if you want be Syrian you can go to Syria…. We can send you Seniora Harriri to join the Mujahidine

      1. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
        Hariri Assaoudi

        ma 3aza allah; hariri is afraid to die; too many car accidents in Lebanon

        1. Prophettttt Avatar
          Prophettttt

          Yes, afraid to die himself,but funds poor ignorant people from poor Lebanese areas to die in Syria.
          I feel sorry for the guy sometimes because He landed in a position He was never prepared for,and it does not look like He was cut for politics or leadership.But again,it’s a Lebanese tradition where sons inherit “leadership” from fathers because non of the rest are ‘qualified”. .Za’im inb Za’im.

          1. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            oh please, this is democracy; dictatorship is only in hezzy assad country; ask 5th drawer

          2. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            The house of “saud” will teach us democracy,lol.
            You heard that 5th?Let me know if you’re signing up for “Saudi democracy” 101.lol

          3. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            you have been kind to call them the house of saud; i would call them the saud bordello or at best saud farm

          4. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            Hariri Assaoudi, It is not kindness that I call them House of Saud, it’s a matter of principle that I don’t use what they call “Saudi Kind**”.This corrupt family changed the name of Arab Peninsula from Hijaz and Najad to their own family name. They dared do something, Prophet Mohammad did not do,even though He was able to.
            Just added a picture of our democracy professor. Maybe that would encourage 5th and others to join the class,lol

          5. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            lol; you did not see the undercover democracy; you got to see the beard under his pants

          6. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            i have the feeling you will soon add a t; lol; for the time being they are leaving me in peace; maybe they discovered the stratagem of late hannybully and they banned him; he used to kick people from here to get them on tayyar blog

          7. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            You mean ‘Itchy skin” and asking for it?. lol. The admin is a weak link, He knows I have thick skin,and I can’t be silenced. He can’t accuse me of cursing,lol
            Last week He deleted two of my comments for saying :”Arab league of dictators”, but I had them saved,and I sneaked them in anyway.
            Plus You do have them occupied for now .lol

          8. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            I wonder if I am qualified to join this class?

          9. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            you need to apply then we study your case

          10. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            if you are the decision maker, I like my chances but if it is wargame, I do not stand a chance.

          11. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            not a difficult course; if 5th passed the exam with an E plus, nobody would have difficulties in having a P

          12. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            Take the case of another student who is now in salafi democracy 204; patients2; he knows three words only; hezzy, hizbushaytan, assad alquaeda; however he knows all the derivatives of these three and he can write an encyclopedia with them; example: hezzy huzzy hozzi hizzi lizzi…………

          13. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            You must be majoring in psychology and specializing in studying the cases of these individuals.

          14. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            lol among others; you meant psychiatry i bet

          15. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            Listen to this southerner joke; um ali and um hussien were talking, um hussien asks um ali, how come every time you do laundry the sun comes out and everything gets dry but when I do laundry it rains and they stay wet. um ali looks at um hussien and says, when I have laundry to do, I ask abu ali in the morning to play with his boom boom, if it leans to the right I know the sun is coming out and I go ahead and do laundry but if it leans to the left I know it is going to rain and I wait, um hussein calmaly looks at um ali and asks what if the boom boom stayed straight in the middle, um ali answers with a smile “Uqber al3gassel wsatoo” um ali and abu ali have better things to do….

          16. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            lol good one ,I have not heard this before.

          17. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            Are you from Nabateiah area?lol

          18. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            I am from east saida, iqlim al touffah region.

          19. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            heard it before

          20. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            I’ve been Been for too long I guess,lol

          21. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            good catch.

          22. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            Hey, Good company is always welcome,we are all qualified to learn democracy 101 from professor Asseer..lol

          23. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            I will only join in if you and Hariri are game.

          24. 5thDrawer Avatar
            5thDrawer

            Too scary … at my delicate age. 😉

          25. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            Never too old to learn. 😉

    7. 30 dead Nusra Al Qaeda fighters by the SAA
      /watch?v=XvVxaCTbTTA

  6. wargame1 Avatar

    Lebanon is a part of Syria so it will be a part of Syria again inshallah,

    1. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
      Hariri Assaoudi

      you meant syria is a lebanese province, big one maybe but arrierated by salafism; we might take back wadi al nassara, we will give party of it to the druze, the shia will add some of the border areas, the kurds will take their part in kamishli, israel already too its part, the alawis will take their part and the rest will be a salafi palestinian state after adding jordan to it; believe you me your allah is impotent and cannot change this; all your allah can do is whenb you curse others by saying “allahouma ouktol al kouffar, allahoumma kill their children…..” but your allahoumma is deaf; 3alehom ya 3arab, ya nawar, ya tatar

      1. IraniAngel Avatar
        IraniAngel

        in that case whats left of syria to the disgusting salafists is the desert. in fact i think the desert and all the lizards living there are what they aspire for the simple reason that they are nothing more than a bunch of lizard eaters. if you know the saudis you know what i am talking about and it turns out that the lizard is the national dish of KSA.. it is a delicatessen which they enjoy 24/7.. for breakfast, for lunch, for brunch, for crunch, for dinner, and when they are up late and they feel like having a midnight snack they serve lizards as well

    2. José Jalapeño Avatar
      José Jalapeño

      What would you do with the majority of Lebanese who want an independent Lebanon? Kill them all? Using moslem swords? I for one am Lebanese and I do not want that union. I hate their accent and their way of life and do not like to be a part of a greater Syria. Let us put it to a vote.

      1. I second that, If he wants to be a Syrian he can leave the way he came…. 75% of Lebanon at least is Christian and Shia if they ever put at a vote it will never happen. Syrians work for us in Lebanon for $20 a day lmaooo…

    3. MekensehParty Avatar
      MekensehParty

      The Golan, South Lebanon, the West Bank and Sinai are part of the Kingdom of Judah and they will be part of Israel again אִם יִרְצֶה הַשֵּׁם

      All the Mediterranean basin is part of the Roman Empire and they will be Italian again – God’s willing
      I can go on forever…

      1. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
        Hariri Assaoudi

        oops i just farted

        1. Patience2 Avatar
          Patience2

          We knew.

          1. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            you seem to know a lot of useless things; one thing you do not know is that if you smell shit it means you are leaking or that you are incontinent

          2. Patience2 Avatar
            Patience2

            Or, you are standing next to Mr. Har-di.

    4. Prophettttt Avatar
      Prophettttt

      Sure, Lebanon can annex Syria and we’ll have a “Greater Lebanon” lol
      one day we can annex Palestine as well.

      1. I am down with that 🙂

      2. 5thDrawer Avatar
        5thDrawer

        Trade-wise, that worked rather well for most people, until the Romans filled in the ocean to ‘conquer’ Tyre.

        1. Patience2 Avatar
          Patience2

          Don’t forget the ‘Roman Turtle’, or, maybe that particular one could’ve been called the ‘Roman Porcupine’?

      3. Patience2 Avatar
        Patience2

        So, let Syria be: Lebanon’s Backyard !!

    5. libnan1 Avatar

      I encourage you and all Sunnis in Lebanon to do a noble thing by going to Syria and fighting for a “greater Syria”. That would be the best thing you can do, we can provide transportation.

      1. Transportation to hell!

      2. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
        Hariri Assaoudi

        did you tell him the salafis are paying 1000 syrian pound per day per moujahid testicle ie if the moujahid has two testicles he will get 2000 a day; the saudi kingdom provides the testicular shield to protect the genitalia upon committing suicidal bombing to kill the alawi kouffar; mind you, it is difficult to find a moujahid with testicles, because if they had the balls in the right place, they wouldnt commit suicide to get sex; they would have real sex on earth

    6. Syria can stay the hell hole it is becoming without Lebanon we have nothing to do with them its there internal conflict. If they seek refuge that’s fine but if you want be Syrian you can go to Syria…. We can send you Seniora Harriri to join the Mujahidine

      1. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
        Hariri Assaoudi

        ma 3aza allah; hariri is afraid to die; too many car accidents in Lebanon

        1. Prophettttt Avatar
          Prophettttt

          Yes, afraid to die himself,but funds poor ignorant people from poor Lebanese areas to die in Syria.
          I feel sorry for the guy sometimes because He landed in a position He was never prepared for,and it does not look like He was cut for politics or leadership.But again,it’s a Lebanese tradition where a sons inherit “leadership” from fathers because non of the rest are ‘qualified”. .Za’im inb Za’im.

          1. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            oh please, this is democracy; dictatorship is only in hezzy assad country; ask 5th drawer

          2. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            The house of “saud” will teach us democracy,lol.
            You heard that 5th?Let me know if you’re signing up for “Saudi democracy” 101.lol

          3. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            you have been kind to call them the house of saud; i would call them the saud bordello or at best saud farm

          4. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            Hariri Assaoudi, It is not kindness that I call them House of Saud, it’s a matter of principle that I don’t use what they call “Saudi Kind**”.This corrupt family changed the name of Arab Peninsula from Hijaz and Najad to their own family name. They dared do something, the prophet Mohammad did not do,even though He was able to.
            Just added a picture of our democracy professor. Maybe that would encourage 5th and others to join the class,lol

          5. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            lol; you did not see the undercover democracy; you got to see the beard under his pants

          6. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            i have the feeling you will soon add a t; lol; for the time being they are leaving me in peace; maybe they discovered the stratagem of late hannybully and they banned him; he used to kick people from here to get them on tayyar blog

          7. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            You mean ‘Itchy skin” and asking for it?. lol. The admin is a weak link, He knows I have thick skin,and I can’t be silenced. He can’t accuse me of cursing,lol
            Last week He deleted two of my comments for saying :”Arab league of dictators”, but I had them saved,and I sneaked them in anyway.
            Plus You do have them occupied for now .lol

          8. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            I wonder if I am qualified to join this class?

          9. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            you need to apply then we study your case

          10. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            if you are the discussion maker, I like my chances but if it is wargame, I do not stand a chance.

          11. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            not a difficult course; if 5th passed the exam with an E plus, nobody would have difficulties in having a P

          12. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            Take the case of another student who is now in salafi democracy 204; patients2; he knows three words only; hezzy, hizbushaytan, assad alquaeda; however he knows all the derivatives of these three and he can write an encyclopedia with them; example: hezzy huzzy hozzi hizzi lizzi…………

          13. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            You must be majoring in psychology and specializing in studying the cases of these individuals.

          14. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            lol among others; you meant psychiatry i bet

          15. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            Listen to this southerner joke; um ali and um hussien were talking, um hussien asks um ali, how come every time you do laundry the sun comes out and everything gets dry but when I do laundry it rains and they stay wet. um ali looks at um hussien and says, when I have laundry to do, I ask abu ali in the morning to play with his boom boom, if it leans to the right I know the sun is coming out and I go ahead and do laundry but if it leans to the left I know it is going to rain and I wait, um hussein calmaly looks at um ali and asks what if the boom boom stayed straight in the middle, um ali answers with a smile “Uqber al3gassel wsatoo” um ali and abu ali have better things to do….

          16. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            lol good one ,I have not heard this before.

          17. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            Are you from Nabateiah area?lol

          18. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            I am from west saida, iqlim al touffah region.

          19. Hariri Assaoudi Avatar
            Hariri Assaoudi

            heard it before

          20. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            I’ve been Been for too long I guess,lol

          21. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            good catch.

          22. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            Hey, Good company is always welcome,we are all qualified to learn democracy 101 from professor Asseer..lol

          23. Persistent Avatar
            Persistent

            I will only join in if you and Hariri are game.

          24. 5thDrawer Avatar
            5thDrawer

            Too scary … at my delicate age. 😉

          25. Prophettttt Avatar
            Prophettttt

            Never too old to learn. 😉

    7. 30 dead Nusra Al Qaeda fighters by the SAA
      /watch?v=XvVxaCTbTTA

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