Was Sabotage behind Russia’s Sukhoi Superjet crash?

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Russian intelligence agencies are investigating the possibility that the U.S. military may have brought down the Sukhoi Superjet that crashed in Indonesia, according to claims in a tabloid.

Citing sources in the GRU, Russia’s military intelligence agency, Komsomolskaya Pravda reported Thursday that interference from a U.S. air force base near Jakarta could have caused onboard equipment to go haywire, leading to the crash that killed 45 people on May 9.

“We know that they have special equipment that can cut communications between an aircraft and the ground or interfere with the parameters onboard. For example, the plane is flying at one altitude, but after interference from the ground onboard equipment shows another,” a GRU general told the paper.

The Sukhoi Superjet 100 disappeared from radar screens on May 9 shortly after the pilot asked for permission to reduce altitude 1,800 meters — a dangerous maneuver in such a mountainous area.

Its wreckage was later found on a spur of Mount Salak, a volcano that has been the site of numerous air crashes in the past.

The claims follow speculation that the crash, which killed 45 people, could have been an act of industrial sabotage.

“The main question is, why did the controller authorize the request to reduce altitude?” a source in Sukhoi asked Komsomolskaya Pravda.

“Maybe he didn’t see that the plane was heading straight at the mountain. On the other hand, we don’t rule out the possibility that this was deliberate industrial sabotage to drive our aircraft from the market,” a source at Sukhoi told the paper.

“When the plane flew toward the mountain it should have triggered an automatic mode that would have guided it away from the obstacle,” a pilot safety official at Domodedovo airport told the tabloid. “At Jakarta airport there is a U.S. Air Force base. And among our staff there is talk — couldn’t a signal have been sent from that base at a particular moment to put the equipment out of order?”

It is not the first time supposed American sabotage beams have been blamed for the loss of Russian equipment.

Last October a former official blamed “powerful American radars” in Alaska for the loss of the Fobos Grunt space probe.

The Sukhoi Superjet 100 is the first new civilian aircraft built in Russia since the Soviet collapse. The model that crashed was on a tour of Southeast Asia to drum up business for the aircraft.

Industry observers have warned that the program may never recover if the investigation finds technical failure was to blame for the crash.

The Moscow Times

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7 responses to “Was Sabotage behind Russia’s Sukhoi Superjet crash?”

  1. MekensehParty Avatar
    MekensehParty

    It’s always America’s fault, this is well known.
    Not that the Russians build the worse planes,
    Its zee amberialist americanz

  2. MekensehParty Avatar
    MekensehParty

    It’s always America’s fault, this is well known.
    Not that the Russians build the worse planes,
    Its zee amberialist americanz

  3. billnajd Avatar
    billnajd

    at least one airplane falls off the sky over Russia every month.
    their technology and way of doing things, lacks lot of proffesionalism and their lack of procedural maintanence is very scary… they do not have the break down of independent authorities to make sure all spec’s & processes are followed. knowing their track of accidents, I have to assume its a mechanical problem or pilot error at the least.

  4. billnajd Avatar
    billnajd

    at least one airplane falls off the sky over Russia every month.
    their technology and way of doing things, lacks lot of proffesionalism and their lack of procedural maintanence is very scary… they do not have the break down of independent authorities to make sure all spec’s & processes are followed. knowing their track of accidents, I have to assume its a mechanical problem or pilot error at the least.

  5. yeah, even when the pilot *requests* to ATC to fly below the minimum obstacle clearance altitude in bad weather in rough terrain and then crashes *above* the altitude requested, it’s the fault of Americans for tampering with the altimeters.  Here’s an idea.  Let’s ignore all evidence and just come up with some vaguely plausible excuse that’s convenient at the moment.

    I don’t think there was a technical failure. I don’t think there was sabotage. I think it was a test pilot demonstrating safety features of the aircraft to potential customers in sub-optimal conditions in unfamiliar terrain. That it resulted in a crash shouldn’t really surprise anyone.

  6. yeah, even when the pilot *requests* to ATC to fly below the minimum obstacle clearance altitude in bad weather in rough terrain and then crashes *above* the altitude requested, it’s the fault of Americans for tampering with the altimeters.  Here’s an idea.  Let’s ignore all evidence and just come up with some vaguely plausible excuse that’s convenient at the moment.

    I don’t think there was a technical failure. I don’t think there was sabotage. I think it was a test pilot demonstrating safety features of the aircraft to potential customers in sub-optimal conditions in unfamiliar terrain. That it resulted in a crash shouldn’t really surprise anyone.

  7. yeah, even when the pilot *requests* to ATC to fly below the minimum obstacle clearance altitude in bad weather in rough terrain and then crashes *above* the altitude requested, it’s the fault of Americans for tampering with the altimeters.  Here’s an idea.  Let’s ignore all evidence and just come up with some vaguely plausible excuse that’s convenient at the moment.

    I don’t think there was a technical failure. I don’t think there was sabotage. I think it was a test pilot demonstrating safety features of the aircraft to potential customers in sub-optimal conditions in unfamiliar terrain. That it resulted in a crash shouldn’t really surprise anyone.

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