German declaration of 1915 massacre of Armenians a genocide upsets Turkey

turkey guilty of genocide
Turkey recalled its ambassador to Germany on Thursday in protest against a parliament resolution declaring the 1915 massacre of Armenians by Ottoman forces a genocide

Turkey recalled its ambassador to Germany on Thursday in protest against a parliament resolution declaring the 1915 massacre of Armenians by Ottoman forces a genocide at a time when Europe is looking for Ankara’s help in the migrant crisis.

Turkey rejects the idea that the killings of Christian Armenians during World War One amounted to a genocide. Its deputy prime minister said the vote was a “historic mistake”.

Even before Germany’s Bundestag lower house of parliament passed the symbolic resolution by an overwhelming majority, Turkey’s prime minister had condemned the motion as “irrational” and said it would test the friendship between the NATO partners.

Within two hours, Turkey had recalled its ambassador to Germany for consultations and summoned a top German diplomat to the foreign ministry in Ankara, according to officials.

Armed riot police were deployed outside the German consulate in Istanbul, near Taksim square, in case of protests.

President Tayyip Erdogan, in Nairobi, said the resolution would seriously affect relations with Germany and the government would discuss what steps Ankara would take.

“The way to close the dark pages in your own history is not by besmirching the history of other countries with irresponsible and groundless parliamentary decisions,” tweeted Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu.

A spokesman for the ruling AK Party responded swiftly to the vote, saying it had “seriously damaged” relations.

In a rare show of unity, three of Turkey’s political parties, including the ruling AK, issued a statement condemning the vote.

“This decision which is against history and the future will no doubt have an impact on German-Turkish relations and will damage bridges of friendship between the two countries,” they wrote in the statement, putting their usual divisions aside.

The timing could not be worse for Merkel, who is relying on the success of an EU-Turkey deal she has championed to stem the flow of migrants to Europe in return for cash, visa-free travel rights and accelerated talks on EU membership.

In an indication of how sensitive the issue was, she did not take part in the vote due to “public engagements”. Later, however, she put the emphasis on the close ties between the two countries.

“Even if we have a difference of opinion on an individual matter, the breadth of our links, our friendship, our strategic ties, is great,” she told reporters when asked about it.

A poll for ARD television showed that 74 percent of Germans support the term ‘genocide’ to describe the killings. Some 57 percent think the resolution will hurt ties with Turkey.

Merkel is also keen to avoid raising tensions with Germany’s roughly 3.5 million-strong Turkish community

“I want to say to people with Turkish roots: you’re not only welcome here but you are part of this country,” said Merkel.

Over a thousand Turks demonstrated against the resolution on Saturday in front of the Reichstag building in Berlin.

The nature and scale of the killings remain highly contentious. Turkey accepts that many Armenians died in partisan fighting beginning in 1915, but denies that up to 1.5 million were killed and that this constituted an act of genocide, a term used by many Western historians and foreign parliaments.

MIGRANT DEAL THREAT?

In Argentina, German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier said he hoped the vote would not prompt Turkey to overreact. “As expected, Turkey reacted and I hope that over the next days and weeks we can manage to avoid overreactions,” he said.

Several German lawmakers said they did not want to point a finger at the current Turkish government but rather wanted to bolster reconciliation efforts between Turkey and Armenia.

“We know from our own experience how difficult and painful it is to work through the past … but only in this way can human trust and strength grow,” Social Democrat Rolf Muetzenich said in parliament before the vote.

Armenia welcomed the resolution. The foreign ministry said Turkish authorities continued “to obstinately reject the undeniable fact of genocide”.

Nearly a dozen other EU countries have passed similar resolutions. French lawmakers officially recognized the Armenian massacre as a genocide in 2001, infuriating Turkey.

Ankara also threatened a “total rupture” with France over a 2012 law outlawing denial of the genocide but France’s highest legal authority ruled that was an unconstitutional violation of freedom of speech, prompting a thaw in relations.

The German resolution says the Armenians’ fate exemplified “the history of mass exterminations, ethnic cleansing, deportations and yes, genocide, which marked the 20th century in such a terrible way.”

It also acknowledges that the German Empire, then a military ally of the Ottomans, did nothing to stop the killings.

 

REUTERS

 

  • Omega

    Armenians and the World must, like for the Holohoax, ask themselves who were the true instigators of the mass-killing …

    http://www.strategic-culture.ORG/news/2011/10/25/the-doenmeh-the-middle-easts-most-whispered-secret-part-i.html

    • 5thDrawer

      Tough to bring out a real history .. isn’t it?

      • Omega

        Always.

        • 5thDrawer

          Armenians were like the Lebanese in those historical days ….
          “It is believed by some historians of the Armenian genocide that the Armenians, known as good businessmen, were targeted by the business-savvy Dönmeh because they were considered to be commercial competitors.”

          • Rudy1947

            It is also believed that the Armenians like the Greeks were Christians and utterly despised by the Islamic Turks. Also, the “Empire” was crumbly and sent back to Turkey and anything not Turkish was held to blame.

          • 5thDrawer

            So you need to read to find out your own history … much of which was stolen or burned as the libraries of Alexandria were a few times, in the political attempts to hide everything ever written – which has been an impossible task, although fairly successful when ‘moulding’ people’s mindsets. (Reminds me of the old book-store in Tripoli a few years back….)
            This from part 2 of Omega’s contribution ….
            “Ibn Saud, the descendant of Dönmeh from Basra, responded: “Yes, if my acknowledgement means so much to you, I acknowledge thousand times granting a homeland to the Jews in Palestine or other than Palestine.” Two years later, British Foreign Secretary Lord Balfour, in a letter to Baron Walter Rothschild, a leader of the British Zionists, stated: “His Majesty’s government view with favor the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people . . .” The deal had the tacit backing of two of the major players in the region, both descendant from Dönmeh Jews who supported the Zionist cause, Kemal Ataturk and Ibn Saud. The present situation in the Middle East should be seen in this light but the history of the region has been purged by certain religious and political interests for obvious reasons.”
            (that needs a repeat …)
            “but the history of the region has been purged by certain religious and political interests for obvious reasons.”

            Always ‘too bad’ that not all the records which travel widely cannot be found by ‘political movers&shakers’ to be destroyed.
            We CAN also note the usage of the word ‘Palestine’ liberally from that period of time.

          • Rudy1947

            The Dönmeh supported the Zionist cause. How nice. Now how the he!! does that relate to the Turkish hatred of Armenians and Greeks.

          • 5thDrawer

            Simplest explanation. They were/are Christian. (not of the ‘born again’ variety…)

          • Rudy1947

            So you are going to take the Dömneh and the Rothschilds who support the Zionist cause and tell me they are responsible for the Armenian Genocide?

          • 5thDrawer

            It’s not me saying it … it’s history telling it … simple.

          • Rudy1947

            Really….where?

          • Hind Abyad

            Very significant and notable that both ex-Ottoman allies during WWI now recognize the Armenian Genocide. Austria last year, Germany today.

          • Hind Abyad

            Greek, Armenians, Russians are Greek Orthodox as in Middle East.

          • Hind Abyad

            Yes they can be found. In 1916 Jabotinsky was editor of Ataturk paper ‘The young Turcs’, which promoted the Armenian Genocide.

          • Hind Abyad

            Very much like the Lebanese..in 1915-1916 100,000 found shelters in Syria, mostly Allepo. 60,000 in Palestine.. as in Lebanon, but now it continues.

            “IT FEELS LIKE 1915 AGAIN IN LEBANON’S OLD ARMENIAN NEIGHBORHOODS – SYRIAN ARMENIAN REFUGEES ARE EVERYWHERE.
            http://www.armenianredwoodproject.org/new-blog/2015/6/15/it-feels-like-1915-again-in-lebanons-old-armenian-neighborhoods-syrian-armenian-refugees-are-a-presence-everyw

          • 5thDrawer
          • Hind Abyad

            Thank you.. .Best Arabic food originated in 3000 old Aleppo.
            I think Syrian Armenians will want to go back to Syria when they can, it’s in their hearts.

  • 5thDrawer

    It’s not as if anyone is blaming Turkish people of 2016 for a genocide in 1915 … after all.
    It’s just one of the ‘historical notes’ of various genocides which can now be admitted happened, in our open and free New World Order … to keep it orderly.

  • Andre

    Accountability is honest responsibility to one’s actions; yet humans, many humans, fail to take responsibility to look in the mirror!