Lebanon appeals to int’l community for help in hosting 1.5 million Syrian refugees

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Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, right, and Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades shake hands before their talks at the presidential palace in Nicosia, Cyprus, on Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017. Hariri is in Cyprus for one-day official talks visit.
Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, right, and Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades shake hands before their talks at the presidential palace in Nicosia, Cyprus, on Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017. Hariri is in Cyprus for one-day official talks visit.

Lebanon appealed on Saturday to the international community for more financial assistance to help the country care for 1.5 million Syrian refugees.

“Lebanon needs assistance from its friends and the international community to care for the refugees,” Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri said after a meeting with Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades in Nicosia.

He added that he requested EU member Cyprus to mediate with EU to increase its refugee financial assistance to his country.

“We host one and a half million Syrian refugees and we have a humanitarian and moral obligation to help these people,” Hariri told reporters after a 90-minute meeting with Anastasiades.

He said that he and Anastasiades discussed ways to tighten bilateral commercial, tourist and energy relations between the two eastern Mediterranean neighbors.

Anastasiades said that he looks forward to host the next trilateral summit between Cyprus, Lebanon and Greece to promote regional and energy cooperation in the light of natural gas discoveries in the Levantine basin.

 

 

Xinhua

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One response to “Lebanon appeals to int’l community for help in hosting 1.5 million Syrian refugees”

  1. Refugee helpers in Germany sued for helping refugees
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/42707500d6023cfd3a1b29e13caecbbbf59e11ce2dd3b63ae984a686ea85129b.jpg
    A administrative court in the central German city of Giessen on Tuesday heard the cases of three refugee helpers who signed declarations guaranteeing the living costs of Syrian refugees – estimated at around €700 per month per refugee for a maximum of three years.

    The cases are part of a series in Germany in which social welfare authorities are demanding money from guarantors even after the asylum seekers have been granted residency rights and refugee status.

    In a ruling made last Friday, a court in Münster declared that William Eichouh would have to pay what he estimated at over €30,000 in back payments for unemployment benefits paid to two Syrians (his brother and sister-in-law) who had their asylum accepted within four months of their arrival.

    The 46-year-old engineer, himself of Syrian origin, said the ruling left him “threatened with ruin.”

    “I have a family, I have to pay a mortgage for a house,” he told the Bild newspaper. He insisted he had been assured that the obligation to pay would end when his relatives were recognized as refugees, but the judge told him he should have called the official who had told him this as a witness.

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