Share:
Lebanese President Michel Aoun, sits at the presidential palace in Baabda, east of Beirut, Lebanon, Monday, Oct. 31, 2016. Lebanon's parliament on Monday elected Michel Aoun, an 81-year-old former army commander and strong ally of the militant group Hezbollah, as the country's president, ending a more than two-year vacuum in the top post and a political crisis that brought state institutions perilously close to collapse. FM Gebran Bassil says Aoun was before Hezbollah's ally when he headed up the Change and Teform bloc but now he is allied with all the Lebanese AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)
Lebanese President Michel Aoun, sits at the presidential palace in Baabda, east of Beirut, Lebanon, Monday, Oct. 31, 2016. Lebanon’s parliament on Monday elected Michel Aoun, an 81-year-old former army commander and strong ally of the militant group Hezbollah, as the country’s president, ending a more than two-year vacuum in the top post and a political crisis that brought state institutions perilously close to collapse. FM Gebran Bassil says Aoun was before Hezbollah’s ally when he headed up the Change and Teform bloc but now he is allied with all the Lebanese AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

President Michel Aoun announced denied on Tuesday that his Free Patriotic Movement’s stance on the electoral law “is  sectarian,” and rejected  proportional representation system  as being proposed stressing that it should have “restraints” or else it would be equivalent to a sudden abolition of political sectarianism.

Aoun claimed that the aim in changing  the electoral law is to achieve fair representation stressing that the balance of power should change.”

“Changing the electoral law is aimed at achieving fair representation,” Aoun told his visitors at the Baabda Palace.

“Aoun outlined  that three reasons that are preventing an agreement on a new electoral law.

1- “Every leader controlling his sectarian community does not want the minority in that community to be represented and does not want the emergence of an opposition popular bloc.”

2- “Some parties fear a change in the balance of power, and certainly the balance of power should change, or else we would have kept the 1992 or 2000 law.”

3- “Each party  wants to steal some parliamentary seats from ‘its neighbor’, and ‘Christians are everyone’s neighbors’, and here lies the problem.”

He stressed that the FPM’s stance “is not sectarian” but rather aimed at “achieving justice and equality.”

“Today they want a proportional representation law without restraints, and this is almost equivalent to the full abolition of political  sectarianism, but we are refusing this and demanding restraints, including a qualification system that allows the election of competent candidates who represent their sects, and we are open to any proposal that truly achieves these goals,” Aoun added.

Aoun’s son-in-law FPM  chief Gebran Bassil   proposed  recently a hybrid electoral law  the so called ‘qualification law’ .In the first round, voting takes place in the current 26 districts ( as per the 1960 law) and voters can only vote for the candidates of their own sect . Two candidates for each sectarian seat qualify for the second round during which voting would take place in 10 newly-proposed  electoral districts and according to a non-sectarian proportional representation polling system.

The electoral system  determines how votes are translated into seats and therefore, how the sectarian/political elite predetermine their shares.

Most of the  parties have dismissed the proposed qualification system as “divisive” and counterproductive.

Share:
This error message is only visible to WordPress admins

Error: No connected account.

Please go to the Instagram Feed settings page to connect an account.