Lebanon: PM Hariri stands firm on Assad ‘crimes’

hariri father's tombLebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri said Monday he stood firm against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s “crimes”, at an event marking the anniversary of his father’s assassination that he has blamed on Damascus.

Hariri, whose father Rafiq Hariri was killed along with 22 other people in a February 14, 2005 bomb blast on the Beirut seafront, was elected as the  prime minister in November for a second time, under an arrangement struck with the pro-Syrian Shiite group Hezbollah.

“We negotiated and we made compromises to preserve stability” in Lebanon, he said in an address to a packed hall in Beirut.

“We have not made, and will not make, any compromise on principles such as the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, on our point of view on Assad’s regime, our stand on illegitimate arms and on Hezbollah’s implication in Syria,” he said to loud applause.

The Hague-based tribunal is responsible for trying Rafiq Hariri’s assassination.

Saad Hariri and his allies demand the disarmament of Hezbollah and its withdrawal from Syria where the Shiite group that also forms part of the Lebanese government has been battling alongside Assad’s forces.

Five members of Hezbollah are being tried in absentia for the 2005 bombing that assassinated former Lebanese PM Rafik Hariri . The defendants, clockwise from top: Hussein Hassan Oneissi, Salim Jamil Ayyash, Assad Hassan Sabra, Hassan Habib Merhi and Mustafa Amine Badreddine.
Five members of Hezbollah are being tried in absentia for the 2005 bombing that assassinated former Lebanese PM Rafik Hariri . The defendants, clockwise from top: Hussein Hassan Oneissi, Salim Jamil Ayyash, Assad Hassan Sabra, Hassan Habib Merhi and Mustafa Amine Badreddine.

Hezbollah, the only group not to have disarmed in the aftermath of Lebanon’s 1975-1990 civil war, insists its arsenal is essential to defend the country against Israel, with which it fought a devastating 2006 summer war.

Five Hezbollah members have been accused by the international court of involvement in the 2005 assassination of Rafiq Hariri, himself a former Lebanese premier.

Both the Syrian government and Hezbollah have repeatedly denied involvement.

  • Niemals

    Saad Hariri stood firm against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s crimes, not many Lebanese have the same point of view in this matter.

    Some Syrians fleeing Syria to avoid punishment for their war crimes are not realizing that the law has its long arm and finds them every-ware anyway.

    Like those stupide syrians that showed to some friends executions videos of 7 Syrian Army soldiers in 2012 taken with their own Smartphones.

    Haisam Omar Sakhanh, who fled to Sweden had successfully claimed asylum in 2013.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/7e8c9c1526e39463fbb2114fe7a8c06aa2264e3b051af1fe6f155867bb968dd5.jpg
    The former rebel, Haisam Omar Sakhanh, 46, was arrested last March in Karlskoga, Sweden, and charged with a crime against international law over his role in the executions of seven Syrian government soldiers who were prisoners of war in Idlib province, Syria.

    Swedish court gave a life sentence to Haisam Omar Sakhanh.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/187feb249dd8f1d7ebba0a257baf1c08b57f4ab0b6da50be4842b852b4d85cdc.jpg
    An image from a video in which Syrian rebels killed a group of prisoners in 2012. Haisam Omar Sakhanh, at far left, has been sentenced to life in prison in Sweden.