U.S. calls for ‘clear timeline’ on Mubarak’s departure

In a phone call with Egyptian Vice President Omar Suleiman, Vice President Biden called for President Hosni Mubarak to spell out when he intends to leave office.

In the strongest words to date, the White House said that during the phone call to Suleiman, Biden “stressed the need for a concrete reform agenda, a clear timeline, and immediate steps that demonstrate to the public and the opposition that the Egyptian government is committed to reform.”

The calls for a “clear timeline” and “immediate steps” demonstrating a commitment to political reform are the latest ratcheting up of public rhetoric about President Obama’s desire that Mubarak exit sooner rather than later.

First the administration called Mubarak an “ally” who needed to usher in reforms, then oficials began to talk about the need for an “orderly transition,” later specified as needing to begin “now.” In a then-private message to Mubarak, President Obama said the next government should not be headed by Mubarak or his son. ABC

  • PROPHET.T

    So many mixed messages,and contradicting statements from Washington.
    One minute,Mubarak can stay until the end of his term,The second,change has to be done immediately,knowing that the demand of the protesters is an immediate resignation of Mubarak.
    I fear that ,if a change is to happen, a blood bath would proceed first.

    • Sebouh80

      Hi PROPHET,
      The Americans are constantly repeating this argument that this is an Islamist movement led by the Muslim Brotherhood and that if Mubarak goes the Jihadis will take over. That is a lie, although American diplomats and politicians are stupid enough to believe it. This movement has nothing to do with jihadi fundamentalism or Islamic politics. The New York Times correctly pointed out: “For many, the Brotherhood itself is a vestige of an old order that has failed to deliver.”
      This great revolutionary movement was not organized by the Muslim Brotherhood or any bourgeois political parties. The Muslim Brotherhood is well organized and has a strong apparatus and money. Its leaders are manoeuvring behind the scenes.But the youth movement is the largest and most determined component of the revolution. It is they who have played the leading the role from the start to finish.
      When these courageous younf men and women who went to the streets on 25th of January, all the political parties including the Brotherhood were taken by surprise. The Muslim Brotherhood did not support them. The youth of 6th April are the ones calling for action. They are the ones who called today’s demonstration. And today, when the revolutionary people marched in their millions, every political party including the Brotherhood were negligible.
      The revolutionary people are not fighting for Islam or any religion. They are fighting for their democratic rights and for national and social liberation. Under Mubarak Islamic extremists murdered Christians. But on the demonstrations Christians and Muslims march together. In Tahrir square there are Muslism and Christians, believers and unbelievers all united in the same struggle against the same oppressors. The revolution has cut across all sectarian divisions. That constitutes its great strength.
      In Tahrir square two days ago there was a placard that reads: “The people want the downfall of the system” Note the exact wording: not just the downfall of Mubarak, but the downfall of the entire system upon which he rests. This is a clear message for those advocating a stable transitional period.
      The problem is the leadership. The bourgeois liberals cannot be trusted. The men who are trying to usurp control are like merchants in a bazaar who will use the revolution as a bargaining piece with which they can haggle with the regime to win positions and careers. They will always betray the people for their selfish interests. The Wafd party and other liberals immediately accepted Mubarak’s “concessions” and ended their participation in the revolution. Al-Baradei is a stooge of the Americans who Washington wishes to put him in power as a replacement of Mubarak. How can the people have confience in men like these?

    • Sebouh80

      Hi PROPHET,
      The Americans are constantly repeating this argument that this is an Islamist movement led by the Muslim Brotherhood and that if Mubarak goes the Jihadis will take over. That is a lie, although American diplomats and politicians are stupid enough to believe it. This movement has nothing to do with jihadi fundamentalism or Islamic politics. The New York Times correctly pointed out: “For many, the Brotherhood itself is a vestige of an old order that has failed to deliver.”
      This great revolutionary movement was not organized by the Muslim Brotherhood or any bourgeois political parties. The Muslim Brotherhood is well organized and has a strong apparatus and money. Its leaders are manoeuvring behind the scenes.But the youth movement is the largest and most determined component of the revolution. It is they who have played the leading the role from the start to finish.
      When these courageous younf men and women who went to the streets on 25th of January, all the political parties including the Brotherhood were taken by surprise. The Muslim Brotherhood did not support them. The youth of 6th April are the ones calling for action. They are the ones who called today’s demonstration. And today, when the revolutionary people marched in their millions, every political party including the Brotherhood were negligible.
      The revolutionary people are not fighting for Islam or any religion. They are fighting for their democratic rights and for national and social liberation. Under Mubarak Islamic extremists murdered Christians. But on the demonstrations Christians and Muslims march together. In Tahrir square there are Muslism and Christians, believers and unbelievers all united in the same struggle against the same oppressors. The revolution has cut across all sectarian divisions. That constitutes its great strength.
      In Tahrir square two days ago there was a placard that reads: “The people want the downfall of the system” Note the exact wording: not just the downfall of Mubarak, but the downfall of the entire system upon which he rests. This is a clear message for those advocating a stable transitional period.
      The problem is the leadership. The bourgeois liberals cannot be trusted. The men who are trying to usurp control are like merchants in a bazaar who will use the revolution as a bargaining piece with which they can haggle with the regime to win positions and careers. They will always betray the people for their selfish interests. The Wafd party and other liberals immediately accepted Mubarak’s “concessions” and ended their participation in the revolution. Al-Baradei is a stooge of the Americans who Washington wishes to put him in power as a replacement of Mubarak. How can the people have confience in men like these?

      • PROPHET.T

        Sebouh8,
        I wish I could have articulated this overall picture of the brave Egyptian revolution as well as you have done.
        This is what I’ve been trying to say, at this forum for the past couple of weeks, is that this is a true revolution being waged by the courageous youths of Egypt who ,not only surprised the traditional Egyptian opposition, but also surprised the so called intellectual elite in the Arab world, as well as most intelligence agencies ,and research centers.
        The young generation is fed up, and demand freedom, respect, and democracy. They demand to be heard, and allowed to live freely .They broke the wall of fear, and will not back down. They demand to live in a free society instead of a police state. This isn’t about Mubarak leaving only, but rather about a total change of regime, and establishing a new political culture.
        The gap between young Egyptians who sparked this movement and the traditional opposition is very obvious in many ways. The opposition’s mentality isn’t much different than that of the regime. They would properly behave the same way if they were in power. The traditional oppositions (many are as corrupt as the ruling party anyway) too, have to learn to change instead of trying to rip the benefits of the youth’s revolution.
        As for the brotherhood , I doubt that they can dominate this movement at this stage, and also doubt that they can win more than 25% of the vote should there be a true and open election.
        The danger lies in the event of failure of this revolution due to regime brutal action. I fear that crushing this movement would give the brotherhood more advantage in the future, to recruit more of the young Egyptians who are truly liberal and secular.
        I believe democracy will moderate the views of the brotherhood, and makes them behave more responsibly because they will be held accountable. Good example, Turkey, Indonesia, even Jordanian brotherhood. In all these countries, Islamits denounce violence, and respect rule of law, and democracy.
        As for the American administrations’ position, I suspect that there are different views puling different strings at the same time. On one hand, some feel that this true opportunity to free the Arab world of the dictators, and take a chance on true democracy and open societies. These groups are betting that dealing with democracy may turn out to be helpful in solving many of the Middle East issues. Some have a personal (Obama personally) interest in seeing democracy flourish.
        On the other hand, there are those who fear that the result of any democracy may limit the way Washington can influence its Middle East policies. Those are the hypocrites who call for democracy, yet they are not willing to adjust their own way of conducting American policy. For these, it’s always been more convenient to deal with corrupt leader/regimes, than dealing with a state that has to answer to its people and parliament.
        At the end of the day, this revolution has put the train of change on its tracks, and there is no going back. I just fear that the Egyptian regime will not give up easily, and it is very likely that we’ll see bloodbath (as hinted by Mubarak) before they leave.

        • nabilabuzaid

          Its rather funny when few Syrians protesters were coming out to protest in favor of egyptian Oppositions, the Syrian Security beat the crap out of them. that sums it up Assad do not care for regime change since it could bring Muslim Brotherhood in control therefore it might influence in his country. What a shame on Syria it calls itself the enemy of Israel but not pro freedom egyptian people..

        • Hannibal

          @ nabil LOL “beat the crap out of them”? NO they are at “you can check in but you can never check out” mazze hotel…

  • PROPHET.T

    So many mixed messages,and contradicting statements from Washington.
    One minute,Mubarak can stay until the end of his term,The second,change has to be done immediately,knowing that the demand of the protesters is an immediate resignation of Mubarak.
    I fear that ,if a change is to happen, a blood bath would proceed first.

    • Anonymous

      Hi PROPHET,
      The Americans are constantly repeating this argument that this is an Islamist movement led by the Muslim Brotherhood and that if Mubarak goes the Jihadis will take over. That is a lie, although American diplomats and politicians are stupid enough to believe it. This movement has nothing to do with jihadi fundamentalism or Islamic politics. The New York Times correctly pointed out: “For many, the Brotherhood itself is a vestige of an old order that has failed to deliver.”
      This great revolutionary movement was not organized by the Muslim Brotherhood or any bourgeois political parties. The Muslim Brotherhood is well organized and has a strong apparatus and money. Its leaders are manoeuvring behind the scenes.But the youth movement is the largest and most determined component of the revolution. It is they who have played the leading the role from the start to finish.
      When these courageous younf men and women who went to the streets on 25th of January, all the political parties including the Brotherhood were taken by surprise. The Muslim Brotherhood did not support them. The youth of 6th April are the ones calling for action. They are the ones who called today’s demonstration. And today, when the revolutionary people marched in their millions, every political party including the Brotherhood were negligible.
      The revolutionary people are not fighting for Islam or any religion. They are fighting for their democratic rights and for national and social liberation. Under Mubarak Islamic extremists murdered Christians. But on the demonstrations Christians and Muslims march together. In Tahrir square there are Muslism and Christians, believers and unbelievers all united in the same struggle against the same oppressors. The revolution has cut across all sectarian divisions. That constitutes its great strength.
      In Tahrir square two days ago there was a placard that reads: “The people want the downfall of the system” Note the exact wording: not just the downfall of Mubarak, but the downfall of the entire system upon which he rests. This is a clear message for those advocating a stable transitional period.
      The problem is the leadership. The bourgeois liberals cannot be trusted. The men who are trying to usurp control are like merchants in a bazaar who will use the revolution as a bargaining piece with which they can haggle with the regime to win positions and careers. They will always betray the people for their selfish interests. The Wafd party and other liberals immediately accepted Mubarak’s “concessions” and ended their participation in the revolution. Al-Baradei is a stooge of the Americans who Washington wishes to put him in power as a replacement of Mubarak. How can the people have confience in men like these?

    • Anonymous

      Hi PROPHET,
      The Americans are constantly repeating this argument that this is an Islamist movement led by the Muslim Brotherhood and that if Mubarak goes the Jihadis will take over. That is a lie, although American diplomats and politicians are stupid enough to believe it. This movement has nothing to do with jihadi fundamentalism or Islamic politics. The New York Times correctly pointed out: “For many, the Brotherhood itself is a vestige of an old order that has failed to deliver.”
      This great revolutionary movement was not organized by the Muslim Brotherhood or any bourgeois political parties. The Muslim Brotherhood is well organized and has a strong apparatus and money. Its leaders are manoeuvring behind the scenes.But the youth movement is the largest and most determined component of the revolution. It is they who have played the leading the role from the start to finish.
      When these courageous younf men and women who went to the streets on 25th of January, all the political parties including the Brotherhood were taken by surprise. The Muslim Brotherhood did not support them. The youth of 6th April are the ones calling for action. They are the ones who called today’s demonstration. And today, when the revolutionary people marched in their millions, every political party including the Brotherhood were negligible.
      The revolutionary people are not fighting for Islam or any religion. They are fighting for their democratic rights and for national and social liberation. Under Mubarak Islamic extremists murdered Christians. But on the demonstrations Christians and Muslims march together. In Tahrir square there are Muslism and Christians, believers and unbelievers all united in the same struggle against the same oppressors. The revolution has cut across all sectarian divisions. That constitutes its great strength.
      In Tahrir square two days ago there was a placard that reads: “The people want the downfall of the system” Note the exact wording: not just the downfall of Mubarak, but the downfall of the entire system upon which he rests. This is a clear message for those advocating a stable transitional period.
      The problem is the leadership. The bourgeois liberals cannot be trusted. The men who are trying to usurp control are like merchants in a bazaar who will use the revolution as a bargaining piece with which they can haggle with the regime to win positions and careers. They will always betray the people for their selfish interests. The Wafd party and other liberals immediately accepted Mubarak’s “concessions” and ended their participation in the revolution. Al-Baradei is a stooge of the Americans who Washington wishes to put him in power as a replacement of Mubarak. How can the people have confience in men like these?

      • PROPHET.T

        Sebouh8,
        I wish I could have articulated this overall picture of the brave Egyptian revolution as well as you have done.
        This is what I’ve been trying to say, at this forum for the past couple of weeks, is that this is a true revolution being waged by the courageous youths of Egypt who ,not only surprised the traditional Egyptian opposition, but also surprised the so called intellectual elite in the Arab world, as well as most intelligence agencies ,and research centers.
        The young generation is fed up, and demand freedom, respect, and democracy. They demand to be heard, and allowed to live freely .They broke the wall of fear, and will not back down. They demand to live in a free society instead of a police state. This isn’t about Mubarak leaving only, but rather about a total change of regime, and establishing a new political culture.
        The gap between young Egyptians who sparked this movement and the traditional opposition is very obvious in many ways. The opposition’s mentality isn’t much different than that of the regime. They would properly behave the same way if they were in power. The traditional oppositions (many are as corrupt as the ruling party anyway) too, have to learn to change instead of trying to rip the benefits of the youth’s revolution.
        As for the brotherhood , I doubt that they can dominate this movement at this stage, and also doubt that they can win more than 25% of the vote should there be a true and open election.
        The danger lies in the event of failure of this revolution due to regime brutal action. I fear that crushing this movement would give the brotherhood more advantage in the future, to recruit more of the young Egyptians who are truly liberal and secular.
        I believe democracy will moderate the views of the brotherhood, and makes them behave more responsibly because they will be held accountable. Good example, Turkey, Indonesia, even Jordanian brotherhood. In all these countries, Islamits denounce violence, and respect rule of law, and democracy.
        As for the American administrations’ position, I suspect that there are different views puling different strings at the same time. On one hand, some feel that this true opportunity to free the Arab world of the dictators, and take a chance on true democracy and open societies. These groups are betting that dealing with democracy may turn out to be helpful in solving many of the Middle East issues. Some have a personal (Obama personally) interest in seeing democracy flourish.
        On the other hand, there are those who fear that the result of any democracy may limit the way Washington can influence its Middle East policies. Those are the hypocrites who call for democracy, yet they are not willing to adjust their own way of conducting American policy. For these, it’s always been more convenient to deal with corrupt leader/regimes, than dealing with a state that has to answer to its people and parliament.
        At the end of the day, this revolution has put the train of change on its tracks, and there is no going back. I just fear that the Egyptian regime will not give up easily, and it is very likely that we’ll see bloodbath (as hinted by Mubarak) before they leave.

        • Anonymous

          Its rather funny when few Syrians protesters were coming out to protest in favor of egyptian Oppositions, the Syrian Security beat the crap out of them. that sums it up Assad do not care for regime change since it could bring Muslim Brotherhood in control therefore it might influence in his country. What a shame on Syria it calls itself the enemy of Israel but not pro freedom egyptian people..

        • @ nabil LOL “beat the crap out of them”? NO they are at “you can check in but you can never check out” mazze hotel…